Tag - Valerie Valcour

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Stop The Bleed
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What Is Your New Years Resolution?
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3-4-50 Recognition
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Join Lamoille County Planning Commission By Becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner
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Improving Health, One Organization at a Time
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What Is a Safe Sleep Environment for Your Baby?
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3-4-50 Vermont
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Are You Prepared?
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Sound Advice and Sun Safety
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What to Do About the Flu?

Stop The Bleed

By: Valerie Valcour

Have you heard the phrase “Stop the Bleed” before? You may have heard it during the month of May as it was National Trauma Awareness Month. Did you know that the person sitting or standing next to you could save your life? One of the most preventable deaths after injury is uncontrolled bleeding. Everyone should be able to recognize life-threatening bleeding, and everyone should be able to take appropriate steps to control bleeding until help arrives. The greater the number of people who know how to control bleeding in an injured person, the greater the chances of survival from that injury.

Stop the Bleed trainings are intended to help people learn how to respond to life-threatening bleeding and ways to stop the bleeding.

Once a month, Copley Hospital Wellness Center, the Morristown Emergency Medical Services (MEMS), and the Lamoille Valley Medical Reserve Corp offer FREE Stop the Bleed classes. Classes and registration are posted on the MEMS Facebook page. They are planned for the first Thursday of each month, one class from 1-2 PM and one from 6-7 PM. Due to the holiday, the July class is scheduled for Wednesday July 10th, at the same times.

The Stop the Bleed classes are located at 539 Washington Highway (Morristown Rescue). Please let us know you will attend by emailing cboisvert@morristownvt.org or phone (802) 888-5628.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

What Is Your New Years Resolution?

A new year has arrived, presenting the perfect opportunity to reflect on the past and reset. Even if you’re not in need of a completely fresh start, everyone can benefit from embracing a more positive frame of mind and a few new wellness goals.

We asked Live Well Lamoille bloggers to share the healthy habits they hope to embrace this year. Here is what they said:

Valerie Valcour, Vermont Department of Health: A renewed focus for me in 2019 is work-life balance. The first step will be to incorporate 10 minutes of meditation into each day. The best time will be the transition between work and home each afternoon and mornings on the weekend. A book with 52 meditative focus areas will be my weekly topic guide. I wish you all the best in accomplishing your goals for 2019.

Caleb Magoon, Power Play Sports: A couple of years ago, I was a bit down in the dumps following a very tough year. In an effort to focus on all the positive things I had going in life, I resolved at the New Year to write a bit about those positive aspects of my life. Rather than a traditional journal chronicling all life events, I decided instead to simply write about positive events, moments of beauty I saw daily, or uplifting interactions with people around me. My goal was to write nearly every day, which I did, albeit not for the whole year.

Though my effort was short-lived, it was not without a positive effect. I found that by focusing on the positive rather than complaining about the many negative things (because that is just too easy), had a profound effect on my outlook.

This year, I plan to do something similar. I have some new and slightly more realistic expectations. I’m quite certain that by taking just a few minutes each week to celebrate the positive things in my life, I will see an improved outlook. Deep in the Vermont winter, many of us struggle to keep a positive attitude. Small exercises like this that take little time can do big things for your mental health.

Dan Regan, Northern Vermont University-Johnson: In 2019 I resolve to continue two strategies, which I’ve begun. The first is: Allot extra time for all tasks and commitments. My mom gave me this advice, and she lived past 95. It means leaving early to pick someone up, arriving beforehand for an appointment or meeting, planning on extra time to cook dinner, complete a report, etc. I’m someone who acutely feels the pressure of an upcoming commitment. For me, and maybe others among you, a more unhurried approach reduces stress, helps control blood pressure and contributes to overall health.

In my seventies, time is obviously precious; but I can’t honestly claim that each second is equally indispensable. So I don’t begrudge waiting and “wasting” some of those seconds. Paradoxically, the willingness to waste some time unapologetically has made my “productive” moments feel—well—more productive and meaningful.

The second resolution is: Minimize multitasking. That means, for starters, no peering at screens while I’m exercising or checking phones when I’m actually watching something. I find the more I commit to uni-tasking, the more I get done. I’m better able to focus on the task at hand. And an unforeseen benefit is that, without distraction, my mind is free to move in unexpected and sometimes productive directions. For instance, I “wrote” this short piece in my head while running in a pool.

I hope I can make good on these two, simple commitments and I wish everyone a good (better) and healthy 2019!

What are your health and wellness resolutions? Maybe you’d like to start meal planning, start walking for 20 minutes per day, or just want to stop overscheduling your calendar to cut down on stress. How do you plan to stick to them? Let us know in the comments section below.

3-4-50 Recognition

By: Valerie Valcour

Lamoille Valley communities value what our natural resources have to offer. We value recreation, locally-grown foods, fresh air, clean waterways, rural traditions, the arts, culture, and historical preservation. These attributes are cherished and promoted throughout local communities and with visitors.

These attributes help to explain why Vermont has been identified as the number one best state to live in according to CNBC and why for several years, Vermont has been one of the top three healthiest states according to the Nation’s Health Ranking.

Vermonters have much to be proud of and there is still work to be done to assure that everyone in our state has an equitable chance to reach their optimum health. In Lamoille Valley, the Vermont Department of Health local office has been, one-by-one, meeting with local businesses, town selectboards, school administrators, child care directors, and faith communities to introduce the 3-4-50 campaign.

Lamoille Valley_Community Health_Chronic Disease

3-4-50 is a simple but powerful way to understand and communicate the overwhelming impact of chronic disease in Vermont. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease/stroke, type 2 diabetes, and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

The 3-4-50 campaign includes tips and strategies to assist our communities or organizations to create meaningful change. We need commitment from all corners of Vermont to embrace these health-promoting strategies. The 3-4-50 campaign can inspire action at all levels, building a foundation for longer and healthier lives for Vermonters, and reduce the escalating costs to treat preventable diseases. The 3-4-50 campaign has developed a “Sign-On” process for any community or organization to meet wellness recommendations.

In Lamoille Valley, nine organizations have signed on as 3-4-50 Partners. The Morrisville District Office of the Vermont Department of Health is proud to report that Copley Hospital, Green Mountain Support Services, Helen Day Art Center, Lamoille County Mental Health, Lamoille County Planning Commission, Lamoille Home Health and Hospice, Little Moose Crossing Childcare, North Central Vermont Recovery Center and Riverbend Market are all 3-4-50 Partners.

You too can sign on as a 3-4-50 Partner and the Vermont Department of Health, Morrisville Office is here to help you achieve your wellness goals. Together we can reduce the burden of chronic disease and close the gap in health inequities. Please contact Valerie Valcour RN at 888-1351 or email Valerie.valcour@vermont.gov for more information.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Join Lamoille County Planning Commission By Becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner

By: Lea Kilvádyová

The Lamoille County Planning Commission was recently recognized by the Vermont Department of Health for their commitment to supporting healthy worksites and healthy communities.  The Lamoille County Planning Commission received a 3-4-50 certificate from the Health Department for being proud partners of the wellness initiative.

Caleb Magoon, Chair of the Lamoille County Planning Commission Board accepts the 3-4-50 Certificate of Partnership from Valerie Valcour of the Vermont Department of Health.

 

3-4-50 signifies 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor diet, and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths. 3-4-50 is a statewide effort to create an epiphany about the behaviors that lead to chronic disease in our state and to engage partners from all sectors in strategies to improve health across our state.

Caleb Magoon, Chair of the Lamoille County Planning Commission Board stated, “The Board worked hard to weave together relevant subjects, trends, and livability principles, such as health, wellness, and economic opportunity, into each chapter of the Regional Plan. “

The Regional Plan is a planning document for all of Lamoille County, which is prepared with extensive public input. The Lamoille County Planning Commission Board reviewed the 3-4-50 principles and unanimously agreed that these wellness principles align with the Regional Plan.

Valerie Valcour of the Vermont Department of Health said,” 3-4-50 Vermont partners, like the Lamoille County Planning Commission and Lamoille County Mental Health help to create healthy and thriving Vermont schools, businesses, communities and individuals. Our Partners understand the importance of community-based efforts to help create a healthy and thriving Vermont, and we are pleased to be working with them.”

Additional information on wellness in your community and becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner is available at https://healthvermont.gov/3-4-50.

Improving Health, One Organization at a Time

By: Valerie Valcour

Did you know that where you live, your zip code, is important to your health? Do you think that where you work, play and learn are also important to your health? How about when you stop in that corner market for a quick snack or when you meet for church service, do you think these places impact your health too? The Vermont Department of Health says yes.

The Vermont Department of Health has added two new organizations to the list of 3-4-50 partners. There are new Tip Sheets and Sign-On forms for retailers and faith-communities. Haven’t heard of 3-4-50?

3-4-50 is a simple but powerful way to understand and communicate the overwhelming impact of chronic disease in Vermont. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease/stroke, type 2 diabetes and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

Retail establishments, like the corner markets, can help you meet your goals for good health by displaying healthy snack options like fruit and nuts and they can keep tobacco products out of eye-sight, especially from children.

Faith-communities can set guidelines that make sure healthy foods are made available during coffee hours, potlucks and meetings. They can also create property-wide tobacco-free spaces. Having bike racks or offering physical activity options for gatherings can also help the overall health of the community.

Join the Lamoille Valley 3-4-50 Partners and sign your organization on to good health and wellness today! http://www.healthvermont.gov/3-4-50


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

What Is a Safe Sleep Environment for Your Baby?

By: Valerie Valcour

 

According to the CDC, in 2016 there were 4.5 infant deaths in Vermont. (CDC, 2017) This is the number of infant deaths (before age one year) per 1,000 live births.

The Vermont Department of Health (VDH) would like to help families not to have this experience. VDH has a web page where you will find 10 tips for making a Safe Sleep Environment for your baby.

VDH is having a discussion group about infant safe sleep. This is your opportunity to share your thoughts with JSI Research and Training Institute (JSI). JSI will be developing a well-researched infant safe sleep education campaign for our Vermont families, professionals and community organizations.

Please join us for a 1.5-hour conversation and snacks! 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 – 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at Copley Hospital, Stephen’s Conference Room. To thank you for your time, each person will be provided with $50 in cash. Please let us know if you plan on attending. For more information, contact Lauren at 603-573-3352, lauren_smith@jsi.com.

 

References

CDC, National Vital Statistics System Retrieved from https://www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/2015-annual-report/measure/IMR/state/VT

PHOTOS BY: Aurimas Mikalauskas/CC BY-SA 2.0, Alick Sung/ CC BY 2.0, Sami Nurmi/ CC BY-NC 2.0, Sharon Mollerus/ CC BY 2.0, Derek Alfonso/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, Kate Williams/CC BY 2.0


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

3-4-50 Vermont

By: Valerie Valcour

Have you heard about 3-4-50 yet? If you haven’t, you will. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors (tobacco use, lack of physical activity and poor diet) that can lead to 4 chronic diseases (cancer, heart disease and stroke, type 2 diabetes and lung disease) that can lead to more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

The good news about the 3-4-50 message is that good health is contagious and the Vermont Department of Health is spreading this good news along with tips and recognition for positive behaviors.

On the 3-4-50 website, we show how communities can support bike paths, sidewalks, smoke-free public spaces, farmers markets and community gardens. Employers can make it easier for employees to take physical activity breaks, support tobacco cessation efforts and add healthy options in vending machines. Schools and child-care centers can provide drinking water all day and activity breaks throughout each day. Your organization can complete a “Sign-On” form and be recognized for your efforts to make your environment healthy.

Over the next few months, I hope to see several schools, businesses and communities get recognized for their efforts because when the environment around us supports positive behavior, it’s easier for all of us to make healthy choices.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Are You Prepared?

By: Valerie Valcour

September is National Emergency Preparedness month. Now is a good time to dust off or create that emergency plan and checklist. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers four weeks of activities to help you be prepared.

Week 1: READY… Build a kit. Make a plan. Be informed.

Many emergencies happen without warning, so it is important that you take steps ahead of time to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. One important way you can prepare is by having a kit ready in case you do not have access to food, water, or electricity for several days after a disaster. In addition to building a kit, talk to your loved ones to develop an emergency plan with the steps you all will take in different types of emergencies and how you will contact one another. Finally, stay informed to make sure you get the information you need when an emergency happens.

Week 2: STEADY…Review your plans and update your kit.

Preparing does not stop after you have your kit ready and your emergency plan in place. In a real emergency, you may become overwhelmed or confused, so it is important to practice your emergency plan. Review the plans and hold practice drills with your whole family. Review and replace the contents of your emergency kit every six months. Be sure to check expiration dates on food, water, medicine, and batteries and add any personal items that are unique to your needs.

Week 3: SHOW… Inspire others to prepare.

Research shows that talking about preparedness increases the likelihood of others taking steps to get prepared. Talk to your family and friends about the important steps they can take to be prepared. Be a preparedness role model – volunteer in your community, take a first aid and CPR class, or share a photo of your emergency kit or share a selfie  of you and your family at your emergency meeting place.

Week 4: GO! Take immediate action to save lives.

It is vital that people take not only immediate but also the appropriate protective action when an emergency happens. Local officials will ask you to shelter in place (take shelter in a basement or windowless interior room) in some situations and to evacuate your home, workplace or community in response in others. Know when to go (or stay), where to go, how to get there and what to do BEFORE an emergency. The most important thing is to take immediate and decisive action.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Sound Advice and Sun Safety

By: Valerie Valcour

How often do you think about your ears? Do you protect your ears from the sun and loud noises? If you do, good for you! I’ve become increasingly aware of my ears after attending a local Farm Health and Safety training sponsored by the Vermont Farm & Safety Task Force.

Regarding hearing loss, the Farm Health and Safety training emphasized that hearing loss is preventable. I did not realize that being exposed to noises above 85 decibels such as noise from a lawnmower, shop tools or a chain saw for more than 2 minutes can cause permanent hearing loss. Check out these fact sheets for more information about protecting your ears:

Sun safety is another way to protect your ears. I am getting better at putting on sunscreen before going outside, but I still have to remind myself to apply it to my earlobes! According to the Vermont Department of Health Cancer Control Program, skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. and Vermont. Melanoma is the least common, but most serious, form of skin cancer. Vermont has one of the highest rates of melanoma incidence in the United States. Most cases of skin cancer are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun, sunlamps, and tanning beds. Sunburns, especially during childhood, significantly increases an individual’s melanoma risk. It’s important to use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher, even in the winter – and don’t forget your earlobes. Here are more Sun Safety Tips to keep you and your family safe from sunburns.

For more information about health promotion and disease prevention visit the Office of Local Health, Morrisville District website.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

What to Do About the Flu?

By: Valerie Valcour

Live Well Lamoille - flu shot

Sometimes I wait until the last minute to get things done. I hate to admit it but I was late getting my flu shot this year, but thankfully not too late! According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), typical flu activity, or influenza season, peaks between December and March. It would have been best if I got my vaccine before the end of December, but one can still get the vaccine throughout the influenza season, while supplies last of course. It is best, however, for individuals who have a compromised immune system, older adults, or children to get the vaccine as soon as it is available. To learn more about the flu vaccine and other vaccinations, check out the Health Department’s immunization website.

What else can I do to prevent the flu? Washing my hands frequently with mild soap and warm water is the best defense. Using an antibacterial hand sanitizer is helpful, in a pinch. It’s important to keep my hands moisturized to prevent cracks and dry skin is also helpful. Keeping surfaces clean and avoiding touching my eyes, nose and mouth, are all ways to try and limit my exposure to the influenza or cold virus. The CDC has a tip sheet on Everyday Ways to Prevent the Flu. Here you can learn how to prevent the spread of flu and cold viruses at home and at work, and there are tips specific for kids too.

Fortunately, I have not had a cold or the flu (yet) and I hope not to get the flu! I will do my best to drink plenty of water, get my servings of fruits and vegetables every day and try to get in my 7-8 hours of sleep each night.

Now if I do get sick, I will plan to stay home and away from public places to prevent further spreading of the influenza virus.

The Vermont Department of Health has several posters and fact sheets to help you understand more about the flu and cold. Check them out!

For more information, you can always call your doctor or the Vermont Department of Health at 802-888-7447. Stay healthy!


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.