Tag - Lamoille Valley

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The Jeffersonville Culvert Program
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2018 Community Health Needs Assessment Posted
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3-4-50 Recognition
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Fabulous Fiber!
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Cool Down in These Lamoille County Public Swimming Holes
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Eating Healthy When Time Is Tight
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Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes
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When to Visit, When to Stay Home
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New Year! New, Tobacco-Free You! (or Family, Friend, Co-Worker or Employee)
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Lamoille County Mental Health: 50 Years in the Making

The Jeffersonville Culvert Program

By: Lea Kilvádyová, Lamoille County Planning Commission

This is a story of one community’s dedication to improving the health of its residents by reducing the occurrence of flooding in the historic core of their village. Read about the intent behind installing a new large culvert under VT Route 15 in Jeffersonville.

Due to its location at the confluence of the Brewster and Lamoille Rivers, the Village of Jeffersonville lies within the 100-year floodplain and is prone to severe flooding. During 2011, Jeffersonville was inundated with floodwaters three times and experienced extensive damage to roads, culverts, businesses, and homes. Mann’s Meadow, housing for families and seniors, was evacuated due to road closure, power outage, and building flooding.

Arial photo of Jeffersonville’s 2011 flooding with an approximate location of flood mitigation improvements (in red).

 

Following the 2011 floods, the community worked with regional planners from Lamoille County Planning Commission and Milone & McBroom Engineers to develop a comprehensive plan to reduce the flooding in Jeffersonville. One part of the plan, and the most recent improvement implemented in November 2018, was the construction of a large flood bypass culvert under Route 15. (A culvert is a structure that allows water to flow under a road, trail, or similar obstruction from one side to the other side.)

The culvert is located between the new Union Bank building and the Joinery/Jeffersonville Automotive. The culvert is designed to reduce flood damages in the Village of Jeffersonville by allowing floodwaters from the Brewster River to flow out of the Village before impacting structures and property. Based on the detailed flood modeling completed after the spring 2011 flooding, the culvert – along with the larger Greenway Bridge installed last year – will significantly reduce flood levels and greatly reduce the need for road closures or evacuations of Village residents in the future.

New flood bypass culvert under Route 15 in Jeffersonville

 

The culvert construction has been made possible in part by funding provided by FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program and Vermont’s Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery Program. For more information, contact Lamoille County Planning Commission at 888-4548.

2018 Community Health Needs Assessment Posted

Results and Implementation Plan are Now Available for Community Review

 

Copley Hospital has completed its 2018 Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) and posted the results and implementation plan on its website, copleyvt.org. Through the CHNA process, Copley has determined the top health needs of the community are: Preventative Care, Mental Health, Chronic Health Conditions, and Substance Use/Abuse. The Hospital has developed, in conjunction with recommendations from local health care and social service organizations, an implementation plan. This plan will help address these needs and includes services/programs the hospital already offers, new services/programs the hospital may add, other organizations the hospital may partner with and metrics the hospital will use to track progress.

“We had a tremendous response to our survey and are grateful to the staff of area social service organizations and agencies and community leaders that helped with the assessment and shaping our Implementation Plan,” said Art Mathisen, Copley Hospital CEO.  “We view this as a plan for how we, along with other area organizations and agencies, can collaborate to bring the best each has to offer to support change and to address the most pressing identified needs.”

A CHNA is a federal requirement of all non-profit hospitals to prove the hospital is providing community benefit and meeting the needs of local residents. The CHNA process follows federal guidelines including gathering statistical data from reputable sources, surveying “Local Experts” who meet specific criteria and developing an implementation plan for addressing the Significant Health Needs in the area.

The complete report can be found here: https://www.copleyvt.org/about-us/community-health-needs-assessment/. Community members can also go to Copley’s Community Relations office and request a paper copy to review.

3-4-50 Recognition

By: Valerie Valcour

Lamoille Valley communities value what our natural resources have to offer. We value recreation, locally-grown foods, fresh air, clean waterways, rural traditions, the arts, culture, and historical preservation. These attributes are cherished and promoted throughout local communities and with visitors.

These attributes help to explain why Vermont has been identified as the number one best state to live in according to CNBC and why for several years, Vermont has been one of the top three healthiest states according to the Nation’s Health Ranking.

Vermonters have much to be proud of and there is still work to be done to assure that everyone in our state has an equitable chance to reach their optimum health. In Lamoille Valley, the Vermont Department of Health local office has been, one-by-one, meeting with local businesses, town selectboards, school administrators, child care directors, and faith communities to introduce the 3-4-50 campaign.

Lamoille Valley_Community Health_Chronic Disease

3-4-50 is a simple but powerful way to understand and communicate the overwhelming impact of chronic disease in Vermont. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease/stroke, type 2 diabetes, and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

The 3-4-50 campaign includes tips and strategies to assist our communities or organizations to create meaningful change. We need commitment from all corners of Vermont to embrace these health-promoting strategies. The 3-4-50 campaign can inspire action at all levels, building a foundation for longer and healthier lives for Vermonters, and reduce the escalating costs to treat preventable diseases. The 3-4-50 campaign has developed a “Sign-On” process for any community or organization to meet wellness recommendations.

In Lamoille Valley, nine organizations have signed on as 3-4-50 Partners. The Morrisville District Office of the Vermont Department of Health is proud to report that Copley Hospital, Green Mountain Support Services, Helen Day Art Center, Lamoille County Mental Health, Lamoille County Planning Commission, Lamoille Home Health and Hospice, Little Moose Crossing Childcare, North Central Vermont Recovery Center and Riverbend Market are all 3-4-50 Partners.

You too can sign on as a 3-4-50 Partner and the Vermont Department of Health, Morrisville Office is here to help you achieve your wellness goals. Together we can reduce the burden of chronic disease and close the gap in health inequities. Please contact Valerie Valcour RN at 888-1351 or email Valerie.valcour@vermont.gov for more information.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Fabulous Fiber!

By: Rorie Dunphey

Health Benefits of Fiber_Whole Grains

Why is FIBER important?

A fiber rich diet has many benefits to a healthy lifestyle. It can reduce your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as several kinds of cancer. It also can improve cholesterol, lower blood pressure, regulate digestion and help with weight loss. With farmers markets and CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture) in full swing now, eating locally produced, fiber-rich foods is both easy and delicious!

What is FIBER?

There are 2 kinds: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber can help control blood sugar and cholesterol, while insoluble fiber adds bulk to our colon and can act like a brush, helping food pass through the digestive tract more efficiently. Fiber can be found in fruits, veggies, whole grains, nuts and beans.

What is a WHOLE GRAIN?

A whole grain has 3 layers: the fiber-rich bran or outer layer, the endosperm or middle layer, and the germ or inner layer. Whole grains are not only rich in fiber, but also are loaded with nutrients. Some examples include whole grain breads, oats, corn meal, bulgur, quinoa, brown rice, farro and popcorn. A refined grain is processed leaving only the middle or endosperm layer is left, thus removing much of the beneficial fiber and nutrients.

How much is ENOUGH?  It is generally recommended that people consume 25 to 38 grams of fiber each day. Add fiber to your diet slowly, over a few weeks. Too much too fast can cause bloating or gas.

How can I add more FIBER to my diet?

  • Eat 5-10 servings of vegetables and fruits per day, ½ cup of whole grains (brown rice, whole grain bread), ¼ cup nuts, ½ cooked veggies, 1 cup of fruit
  • Read labels! Choose breads, cereals, pasta and crackers that list ‘Whole Grain’ as the first ingredient. Look for the ‘Whole Grain’ stamp on the package and beware of deceptive marketing. ‘Multi Grain’, ‘wheat’ and ‘enriched flour’ do NOT mean whole grain. Products with at least 10% of the ‘percent daily value’ are generally fiber-rich foods.
  • Eat more recipes with beans, barley, lentils, quinoa, bulgur or brown rice
  • Eat oatmeal or whole grain cereal for breakfast
  • Buy unprocessed foods, as processing often removes the fiber.

How do you sneak more fiber into your diet?


Rorie Dunphey works under Vermont’s Blueprint for Health as the RN Chronic Care Coordinator at Family Practice Associates in Cambridge. She works one-on-one with people and also leads classes to promote health and help people better manage their chronic diseases. She also assists patients in accessing community and state resources to better coordinate their health and wellness needs. Rorie has a particular passion for promoting a healthy diet and exercise routine to inspire people to live their best life.

Cool Down in These Lamoille County Public Swimming Holes

By: Lea Kilvádyová

When summer temperatures spent days hovering close to 90 degrees, I found it refreshing to cool down in Vermont’s bodies of water. Brooks, rivers, ponds and lakes, Lamoille County has got it all!

Journey's End_Johnson VT Swimming

In Johnson, where I live, the community has been working diligently to preserve public access to water so we all can enjoy this precious resource in perpetuity. “Journey’s End” is a spectacular swimming hole and waterfall carved into the bedrock of Foote Brook. It takes a short 10-minute walk to reach Journey’s End from a public parking pull-off about 0.4 miles up Plot Road. The trail has been cleared, is well marked, and the walk is easy thanks to Johnson Conservation Commission building wooden bridges and steps along the way.

Journey's End_Johnson VT Swimming

My other recommendation is for Beard Recreation Park, located on School Street just below the Powerhouse Covered Bridge. For generations, local residents and visitors have enjoyed a beautiful, Olympic-sized swimming hole and a beach along the Gihon River. The Town purchased and conserved the land in 2015. Thanks to the Town’s effort, this land will now forever be accessible to the public as the “Beard Recreation Park”. With approximately 600 feet of river frontage, this parcel possesses beautiful shoreline, waterfalls, and swimming spots along the Gihon River. The park also features a picnic table, a grill, and a stone stairway installed by Johnson Conservation Commission.

For more information on places to enjoy in Johnson all year long, visit www.johnsonconnect.net.

Eating Healthy When Time Is Tight

By: Leah Hollenberger

Earlier this year, I attended a meeting that discussed food security in our community. Access to good, nutritious food is important because eating lots of fruits and vegetables can help prevent chronic conditions and diseases. Lots of numbers and statistics were shared at the meeting but one that jumped out was that 70% of Lamoille County residents don’t eat the recommended daily 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables.

Think about that. Out of 10 people, 7 of us do not eat the recommended daily 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables. I say us because I admit I have had to work at getting 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables into my meals every day.

Lamoille County has outstanding resources to increase access to food, so perhaps access is not the only issue preventing so many from eating the recommended servings. Perhaps it is a combination of access, budget, time, and awareness. In other words, sometimes it is a lack of time to cook, other times it is a lack of planning meals in advance (which helps save money), sometimes it is because we’re eating out and not making good choices, and sometimes we’re just trying to make a meal out of what is left in the refrigerator or pantry.

How can we change that statistic? It’ll take a variety of approaches, but individually we can each start by cooking at home more and being more mindful of eating more fruits and vegetables.

Menu planning_Eating Healthy When Time is Tight_Copley Hospital_Live Well Lamoille

After making note of what I ate every day for a couple of days, I realized that I typically ate 2 vegetables at dinner if it was cooked at home and a fruit at lunch or as a snack. As empty nesters, my husband and I were definitely cooking dinner less often and eating out more which was also affecting our budget. What I ate for lunch sometimes got me up to 5-6 servings, but not consistently. So I decided to set three goals. The first goal was to eat at least one fruit at breakfast and one fruit and one vegetable at lunch. My second goal was to try to eat more meals prepared at home and if we ate dinner out, to include at least two vegetables. My other goal was to keep it simple: simple ingredients, simple prep. Who wants to spend a lot of time cooking or cleaning up?

That means breakfast is a cup of Greek yogurt with fresh berries or a cut-up peach, or two scrambled eggs followed by an apple, or peanut butter on wheat toast with a banana. For my husband, it means a whole grain cereal with fruit on top. Using fruit that is in season saves money, but you can also compare the cost of using frozen or canned fruit (packed in its own juice), or applesauce to stretch your budget.

For lunch, Copley Hospital’s Café offers a vegetarian entrée – often using locally-sourced, farm fresh vegetables – as well as a well-stocked salad bar. To encourage its employees to make healthy choices, they give employees one free fruit each work day. That helps me with my goal of keeping it simple. If I pack my lunch, it is usually leftovers from last night’s dinner, along with carrots or half a red pepper cut into strips. My husband usually eats beans and rice for lunch. (Yes, he eats the same thing for breakfast and lunch every day. He makes a big pot of beans and rice every weekend and eats from it all week.)

For dinner, I discovered that pre-planning really helped us cook more at home. I tend to be the planner of the family, so I’ll make a large meal like pulled chicken or vegetarian chili in the crock pot on the weekend and plan several meals out of it. For example, we’ll have chili with cornbread one night; the second night, chili over baked potatoes; and the third night scrambled eggs with chili or chili with grilled cheese sandwiches. Stir-frys are fast and easy and, with so many different sauces one can make, along with using different vegetables, it is hard to get bored with them. Omelets with spinach, tomato, and mushrooms; tuna salad with red pepper and onion served on fresh spinach leaves; Mexican restaurant style black beans with ground turkey tacos are just a few of the quick meals we routinely cook. Since I’m not one to eat the same thing day after day for dinner and our schedules change constantly, I try to plan 3-4 dinners for the week at a time, using the supermarket sale flier, and try not to repeat any from the week before so we’re not eating the same few meals. Purchasing fruits and vegetables that are in season keeps costs reasonable but we also use frozen vegetables like corn, green beans, peas, carrots and broccoli and canned beans because they are easy and you can buy extra when they are on sale.

We have a couple of go-to resources we use for recipes. These include EatingWell.com, Skinnytaste.com, and Mark Bittman’s cookbook “How to Cook Everything.”  I also check out cookbooks from my local library and Copley Hospital’s Medical Sciences Library, which is open to the public. If we find one we really love, I’ll write it down and file it in our 3-ring binder for recipes.

Other resources to help you reach the recommended 5-9 servings of fruit and vegetables include:

  • Healthyinasnapvt.org: A great website from the health department with tons of tips for everyone on stretching the food dollar.
  • 3SquaresVT:  Call 1-800-479-6151.  You can get 3SquaresVT benefits even if you do not get any other benefits from the state. If you get 3SquaresVT benefits, you will not be taking them away from others. 3SquaresVT is an entitlement program which means everyone who is eligible for 3SquaresVT benefits has a legal right to get them.
  • Johnson/Lamoille Valley CommUNITY Meal: United Church of Johnson, 100 Main Street, Johnson. 802-635-143.
  • Lamoille Community Center Community Meal:  24 Main Street, Morrisville, VT.  802-888-4302.
  • Meals on Wheels of Lamoille County:  24 Upper Main Street, Morrisville, VT. 802-888-5011.
  • (Free) Breakfast On Us: M-F, 7am-9am, First Congregational Church,  84 Upper Main St, Morrisville, VT. 802-888-2225.
  • Lamoille Community Food Share: M-F, 9am-11:30am; Sat 9:30am-11am. 197 Harrel St, Morristown, VT. 802-888-6550.
  • Johnson Food Shelf: Tues. & Fri, 9am-12noon. 780 Railroad St. 802-635-9003.
  • Call 2-1-1 and ask about food and nutrition resources available to you or check out the link for a list. The list includes WIC, summer meals programs, emergency food shelves and community meal sites, the Learning Kitchen and UVM Extension’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program.

Leah Hollenberger is the Vice President of Marketing, Development, and Community Relations for Copley Hospital. A former award-winning TV and Radio producer, she is the mother of two and lives in Morrisville. Her free time is spent volunteering, cooking, playing outdoors, and producing textile arts. Leah writes about community events, preventive care, and assorted ideas to help one make healthy choices.

Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes

By: Alexandra Duquette

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American adults of all backgrounds. Many of these deaths are largely preventable through lifestyle modification. Along with exercise, diet can play a role in maintaining your heart health. Following a diet that is low in saturated fats and sodium, and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help keep your ticker ticking for many years to come.

To celebrate American Heart Month, here are a couple great recipes that your heart will appreciate!

 

Hearty Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 cup dried lentils, rinsed
  • 2 celery ribs, sliced
  • 1 small bell pepper, the color of your choice, chopped
  • ¼ cup uncooked brown rice
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ cup tomato paste

Directions:

  1. In a large saucepan, combine all ingredients except tomato paste. Bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1-1.5 hours or until lentils and rice are tender.
  3. Add the tomato paste and still until blended. Cook for 10-15 minutes more. Discard bay leaf.

Serves 6

Nutritional Information per serving:

Calories: 206, Fat: 1.4 grams, Saturated Fat: 0 grams, Cholesterol: 0 grams, Carbohydrate: 36 grams, Dietary Fiber: 12.6 grams, Protein 12.9 grams

 

Salmon Burger with Bok Choy, Ginger, and Lemongrass

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. Salmon Filet or Canned Salmon (packed in water)
  • 3 cups Bok Choy (or any dark leafy green) chopped finely
  • 3 Scallions, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. Ginger, finely grated
  • 1 Large Egg White
  • 1 Tbsp. Dried Lemongrass
  • 1 Tbsp. Low-Sodium Soy Sauce

Directions:

  1. Cut salmon into ¼ inch dice (or use canned salmon), stir into mixture of bok choy, scallions, ginger, and lemongrass until combined.
  2. Beat together egg white and soy sauce in a small bowl and stir into salmon mixture.
  3. Form into four patties that are ½ inch thick.
  4. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add 1 Tbsp. of olive oil to cover bottom of skillet. Add salmon patties, cooking for approximately 3-4 minutes per side.
  5. Serve hot. These burgers can be served over a bed of salad greens for a low carb option!

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories: 399(285 without burger bun), Fat: 21.9 grams, Saturated Fat: 3.1 grams, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Carbohydrate 39.9g (19 grams without bun), Dietary Fiber: 4.1 grams, Protein: 12.1 grams

 


Alexandra Duquette is the Clinical Dietician for Copley Hospital, where she sees inpatients and outpatients daily. As a former pastry chef, she has realigned her career to aid people in enjoy food while keeping their bodies healthy and strong.

When to Visit, When to Stay Home

By: Mary L. Collins

My great aunt was well into her 90’s when she passed away some years ago. She was an independent, active person who continued to work as a volunteer at her church, walking the three blocks from home, up the steep steps of the cathedral’s entry, spending many hours there multiple times a week to dust the pews – of which there were hundreds. She also mowed her own lawn – with a push mower – the old-fashioned kind that relied not on a gas-powered engine, but on physical strength.

You might say she had an indomitable spirit. She did, indeed. But she did not have an indomitable body.

When my great aunt passed away in the spring of the year, it followed two weeks of sickness due to a cold that evolved into pneumonia. That evolved into a hospital stay, and finally, sadly, her eventual passing. It is not uncommon for vulnerable elders to succumb to pneumonia. Respiratory illnesses younger persons can more easily recover from are often extremely risky when contracted by an elder.

This is not an alarmist’s tale, but one of practicality and consideration. Given that flu season is upon us, and with the recent frigid temperatures, it’s especially important that the most vulnerable among us are shielded in all the ways that we can provide it from exposure to illness. It is essential to be vaccinated and be provided proper medical care to prevent outbreaks of the flu and other airborne illnesses, but it is equally important to be aware of one’s exposure.

It will probably come as no surprise that my great aunt had been exposed to someone who visited her when they were still experiencing flu-like symptoms.  Those of us who are younger and often “tough it out” when we are sick do not always recognize when we might still be contagious to others and when we might risk putting a more vulnerable loved one in harm’s way. Contagious winter illnesses can create a real risk for the elderly, young children and the more vulnerable among us. It is not our intent to cause harm, but we sometimes do so without knowing.

At The Manor, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center and residence to approximately 88 vulnerable elderly people at any given time, staff education, and training is critical to maintaining a safe environment for residents, staff and visitors alike. Policies and procedures are in place for staff who are taught what are “best practices” when working with residents who may have shown symptoms that could be contagious. In closed environments like The Manor, it is critical that these procedures be followed to minimize the risk to residents, visitors, and fellow staff.  According to Staff Educator and Infection Preventionist, Nicole Keaty, RN,

“We are working very hard to keep our residents and staff healthy at all times but especially during the winter months when Flu and other viruses are more prevalent. We ask the community’s help in this effort. We love to see family and friends visit the residents but we strongly encourage that if you are ill, feeling under the weather, or have family members who are ill, it may be better to not visit.”

Getting an annual flu vaccine is the first and best way to protect yourself and your family from the flu. Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations. It’s not too late to schedule yours. Contact your health care provider to find out what’s best for you.

Keaty offered a few tips on what works best when visiting a loved one during cold and Flu season. “Most viruses are contagious before we are having symptoms. If you do visit The Manor, we have hand sanitizer at our entrances as well as masks. These are for visitors’ use. We recommend that visitors sanitize upon entering and again when you leave so you don’t bring anything home with you.” She offered that masks are available for visitor’s use should you have a cough, cold or sore throat or if you are visiting a resident who has any respiratory illness. And, the tried and true recommendation of frequent handwashing is also one of the best things we all can do to prevent the spread of any viruses.

The public has a critical role in this prescription for health care management – and it is a simple one:

“If you are not feeling well or believe you may be suffering from a cold, Flu or other communicable illness; it is always best to err on the side of caution and NOT visit your loved one until you are no longer contagious.”

Your consideration of your loved ones includes your own self-care. By keeping yourself healthy, you also protect the people you love most.


Mary L. Collins is the Marketing Director at Lamoille Home Health & Hospice. A 2014 Home Care Elite Top Agency, LHH&H is one of eleven VNAs of Vermont home health and hospice agencies serving Vermont. She also serves as Marketing Director at The Manor, a 4 star nursing home and short term rehabilitation facility in Morrisville, VT, and she chairs the Lamoille Region Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. 

New Year! New, Tobacco-Free You! (or Family, Friend, Co-Worker or Employee)

By: Alison Link

For many of us, the New Year has become a time of resolutions and goal setting. In this post, we want to share smoking and tobacco cessation stories and resources to encourage all who may be considering quitting smoking or reducing exposure to second-hand smoke. In Vermont, three behaviors – one being tobacco use – lead to four chronic diseases (cancer, heart disease, lung disease and diabetes) result in over 50% of deaths. (Learn more here.)

802 Quits

Vermont quit smoking resourceAs we know, behavior change is difficult. So what factors help those who are using tobacco make the shift in their stage of change from pre-contemplation or contemplation to action, making a quit plan and implementing it with the support they need? What follows here are a couple of personal stories of those impacted by 802 Quits.

This fall, Hiata Kirby, a Healthy Lamoille Valley staff member, was searching our website for upcoming edits, a process that led her to http://802quits.org. A smoker of 12 years, she wondered how the site worked and how it could help her. As she continued deeper into the 802 Quits website links and articles, she thought, “I can do this!” and started making a plan. She set a quit date 3 weeks away as the prompts on the site helped her to think through choosing a realistic quit date. The site also helped her plan for what she would do when having a craving and identify the nicotine replacement therapy (gum, patches, and/or lozenges) she wanted to use. She was able to place an order to have them mailed to her in time for her quit date.

This New Year’s Eve, she will be 4 months smoke-free with many thanks to her husband and son who have encouraged her to quit. It’s not easy, but Hiata reports taking lots of deep breaths, and being extra vigilant. She is grateful for the free nicotine replacement, and that it arrived in advance of her quit date. The arrival of the products was another day that she looked forward to within the process. Reflecting on her experience thus far with 802 Quits, Hiata said,

“I think the thing I liked the most about 802 Quits and quitting… and my best advice to others hoping to quit, is to make a plan. It takes a long time to break a habit…stay busy and figure out how to not have nicotine in your life. My incentive is the health part and my family.”

Hiata is not alone in this appreciation for the support and free quit products offered by 802 Quits. Casey Dewey, Development Coordinator at Green Mountain Support Services, quit recently through a class offered in conjunction with 802 Quits and Vermont Quit Partners at her workplace. She said,

“802 Quits was very helpful. It made it financially affordable to quit. It would have been cheaper in the moment to keep smoking. It was important to be able to quit with people I know and who I used to smoke with in the past. Now, we go for walks and still make the time for that few minutes break.”

Hiata and Casey both mentioned that they still take a break, just not a smoke break. Instead, it’s an outside break, often with a social component and sometimes a walk. Planning in advance for the free nicotine replacement products was very helpful for both of them, as well as the planning for the next round in advance. Whether using 802 Quits online or through a class, those connected to the program feel supported. 

Local Classes Starting in January

If you are interested in a local cessation class, two classes are starting in January. Classes run for 4 weeks and provide 8 weeks of free nicotine replacement for those interested and a free gift card once the course is completed.

Erica Coats, of CHSLV coordinates the Lamoille Valley classes and shares the importance of the 802 Quits partnership. “802 Quits provide the community with resources and education surrounding how to quit and how to get connected with the resources. 802 Quits has been a great supporter for the cessation classes here in Lamoille county, providing participants with 8 weeks of free nicotine replacement as well as quit tools to help individuals be successful in their drive to quit tobacco.”

Kate Myerson, Tobacco Cessation Specialist and a Class Facilitator, adds, “Classes are a great way to learn from others going through the same thing without fear of judgment.”

January cessation class start dates:

  • January 10th – Cambridge Family Practice 5-6pm
  • January 18th – SASH building in Morrisville 5-6pm

**If you are an employer and interested in offering a cessation class at your workplace, please contact Erica at (802) 253-9171 or Alison at alison@healthylamoillevalley.org.

Sneak peak!

What to look out for in the next months from 802 Quits website:

  • A new look and updated website launch!
  • Based on customer feedback and research, 802 Quits will become more accessible for those interested in using the resource.
  • 802 Quits will help folks take action around cessation- quit on their own and get medication to help.
  • Quit Your Way! Regardless of how an individual wants to quit… on phone, in person, online, the website will have relevant and useful information. There will be opportunities to learn what to expect with and compare the different options.
  • 802 Quits can help those interested motivate themselves, learn why they smoke and create strategies to help with that, create a quit plan, and receive information on putting a plan into action.

 


Alison Link is the Policy and Community Outreach Coordinator for Healthy Lamoille Valley, where she spends two-thirds of her time working on the new tobacco prevention grant received from the Vermont Department of Health. Alison can also be found teaching courses at Johnson State College, volunteering with restorative justice programs and supporting individuals in valuing their time, staying healthy and enhancing their leisure lifestyles through her own initiative, The Leisure Link. Alison enjoys the quality of life in Vermont and lives in Morrisville with her husband, Rabbi David Fainsilber (of the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe) and their young children.

Lamoille County Mental Health: 50 Years in the Making

By: Savi Van Sluytman, CEO, Lamoille County Mental Health Services

A half-century ago, Lamoille County Mental Health opened its doors to serve the community.  Like you, we know that our neighbors have good days and bad days, ups and downs. It is our commitment that when our neighbors need help, we will be there to reach out a hand.

In the 50 years that we have been serving the Lamoille Valley, the way we respond to the needs of our neighbors has drastically changed. Much of our work happens right in the communities where our consumers live—in their homes, in their schools, in their child care programs, in their jobs.  We know that the best path to health and wellness is the one that ensures a full, meaningful life. A steady job, success in school, strong relationships and good friends, good nutrition and healthy exercise, feeling the sun on our faces and clean, fresh air in our lungs.

Every day at Lamoille County Mental Health, we are taking steps to ensure that no one in our community falls through the cracks. We provide the safety net that so many Vermonters need at some point in their lives. Many of us live here because, yes, it’s a place of rare and often breathtaking beauty, but also because we hold common values: that when a neighbor slides off the road on a snowy afternoon, we stop to help. When someone is struggling with an internal battle, we reach out a hand. Every Vermonter should be able to live healthy, productive lives.

We provide the safety net that so many Vermonters need at some point in their lives. In a state such as this, no one should go hungry, which is why we have a food shelf that on any given week is stocked with fresh fruits, vegetables, dairy, meats, and non-perishable items.

If someone is struggling with the confidence they need to get back to work, we bridge that gap, empowering them to find and keep a job. We help them with every step where they need a guiding hand, and when they are ready to take the next step alone, we step back—but not away.

When someone is struggling with homelessness, we fight fiercely to find housing for them.  When transportation is a barrier to work, our supported employment dispatch team ensures that they can get there. We combat isolation by bringing people together for music and yoga classes, lunch, Special Olympics teams and support groups. After a few athletes in our community expressed interest in creating a Special Olympics swim team this fall, we found a head coach and we are scouring the community for assistant coaches and swim partners to accompany athletes in the pool, as well as a sponsor to cover the cost of using the pool at Johnson State College—please reach out if you are interested!

As we look to 2018 and our 51st year, we are thrilled to bridge community partnerships as we work to implement a capital campaign to support community needs. Our 2018 capital campaign goals are to:

  • Build an Imagination Center to benefit children with autism, behavioral and learning disabilities, as well as for elders with dementia;
  • Fund the Tiny House Project. Build four independent living “tiny houses” for people with developmental disabilities on the Oasis House property;
  • Provide matching funds to support the creation of affordable housing for people at risk of homelessness in community centers where it does not currently exist.

With these efforts, we seek to better serve the needs of our most vulnerable citizens.  To learn more, visit www.lamoille.org.