Tag - Hardwick

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WIC Offers Fresh Produce From Local Farms
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Building Resilience and Hope in Children and Youth
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Saturday, October 28 is Prescription Drug Take-Back Day
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Move of the Month: Push-Up Progression

WIC Offers Fresh Produce From Local Farms

By: Nancy Segreto, WIC Nutritionist, Vermont Department of Health

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)  provides wholesome food, nutrition education and community support for income-eligible women who are pregnant or post-partum (including fathers and caregivers), infants, and children up to 5 years old. Our community now has three clinic locations, located in Johnson, Hardwick, and Morrisville.

In addition to the standard food offered by WIC, each summer the Morrisville WIC office distributes coupons worth $30 – $60 to families. These “Farm to Family” coupons can be used as money to buy produce from participating farmers at Vermont Farmer’s Markets, from July through the end of October. Families can meet the farmer who grew their food, tasting new foods while developing an appreciation for fresh, local whole foods. This program also supports Vermont farmers who receive 100% of the coupon value.

WIC recently partnered with Lamoille Valley Gleaning to offer monthly “WIC Gleaning Taste Tests” under our tent in the Morrisville WIC office parking lot. For those who may not know, “gleaning” is the gathering of extra crops from the fields after the harvest. Gleaning helps keep fresh, wholesome food in our community and supports a healthy food system. Past events have offered freshly harvested green beans, zucchini, lettuce, baby kale, arugula and more. Taste-tests and recipes are provided with themes such as pasta salads, soups, baby foods, and holiday inspirations.

The next WIC Gleaning Taste Tests will take place August 2, September 13, October 11, and November 8, from 2- 3:00pm at the WIC office (63 Processional Dr, Morrisville).

Families with Medicaid or Dr. Dynasaur insurance are income eligible for WIC. Know a family who might qualify for WIC? Tell them about us!

To connect with WIC today, visit: healthvermont.gov/wic or call 800-649-4357 or 802-888-7447 (Morrisville). WIC is an equal opportunity provider. For more information about WIC, visit the Health Department website at http://www.healthvermont.gov/local-health-offices/morrisville/wic-services.

Building Resilience and Hope in Children and Youth

By: Scott Johnson, Lamoille Family Center

In a 2017 article co-authored by Boston Pediatrician, Bob Sege, MD, PhD, et al., the authors highlight recently released data about fostering healthy childhood development by promoting positive experiences for children and families. The article recognizes that many families experience hardship and adversity, and they point to research about the importance of balancing those adversities and early life traumas with positive experiences that can grow hopefulness. The piece is called: Balancing Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) With HOPE* New Insights into the Role of Positive Experience on Child and Family Development, and the full article can be found at this website: https://www.cssp.org/publications/documents/Balancing-ACEs-with-HOPE-FINAL.pdf.

Assuring healthy outcomes for children is important and complicated work. Families, communities, schools, and workplaces all play a role in the support and development of healthy children. The Lamoille Family Center works across the Lamoille Valley region (Lamoille County plus the towns of Craftsbury, Greensboro, Hardwick, Stannard, and Woodbury), fostering hope and positive outcomes for children, youth, and families.

One way we build hope and support healthy lifestyles is through our “Send a Kid to Camp” program. Initiated as a celebration of the Family Center’s 40th anniversary three years ago, this highly successful program supports local children who otherwise would not be able to afford a summer camp experience. International expert and researcher on childhood trauma, Michael Unger, PhD, believes that camps can play a critical and positive role in a child’s trajectory.

“Camps help children feel in control of their lives, and those experiences of self-efficacy can travel home as easily as a special art project they carry in their backpack. Children who experience themselves as competent will be better problem-solvers in new situations long after the smell of the campfire is forgotten.”

The Family Center works with local schools and sister agencies to identify children who want to go to camp but whose families cannot afford to send them. In the camp’s second year, we were able to send 45 kids – almost double the number of kids to camp from the inaugural year. This year we are on track to treat 59 kids to outdoor and other fun camp experiences.

Here’s what one mother said about her son’s first camp experience:

“He came home from camp grinning ear to ear! Though it will take many months for him to tell us all about camp, he did say, ‘I have SO many friends, him and him and him and her. I don’t know their names but they are my friends.’ As we drove away from Camp Thorpe he was waving and people were waving goodbye and telling him they’d see him next year. I never ever imagined there would be a camp for him.”

We look forward to hearing from more kids this year with their stories about their summer experiences. Building hope in children is the best part of our jobs, and we believe these are smart investments in our future.

Saturday, October 28 is Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

Police & Sheriff Departments, Kinney Drugs Accepting Unused, Unwanted, Expired Prescription Drugs

Most people who abuse prescription painkillers get them from friends or family – often straight out of the medicine cabinet. By ensuring the safe use, storage and disposal of prescription drugs, you can help make sure drugs don’t get into the wrong hands, or pollute our waterways and wildlife.

Health departments and drug disposal sites around the country are joining the Drug Enforcement Agency this Saturday, October 28, for National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, providing a safe, convenient and responsible way to dispose of prescription drugs. The last event took place on Saturday, April 29, when Vermonters brought back 5,553 pounds of prescription drugs.

You can drop off unwanted prescription drugs (pills only, no sharps or liquids) on Saturday, October 28 from 10am-2pm to:

  • Hardwick Police Department
  • Kinney Drugs in Cambridge
  • Kinney Drugs in Morrisville
  • Lamoille County Sheriff’s Department in Hyde Park
  • Stowe Police Department

As always, unwanted medicines may be turned in anytime at the Hardwick Police Department and the Lamoille County Sheriff’s Department.

For more information, visit healthylamoillevalley.org/prescription-drugs and http://www.healthvermont.gov/alcohol-drugs/services/prescription-drug-disposal.

 

Move of the Month: Push-Up Progression

Push-ups are a great way to strengthen your arms, chest and shoulders. They help strengthen muscles and bones, improve balance and posture, and help prevent lower back injury.

Best of all, push-ups don’t require special equipment or a gym membership to perform. Vin Faraci, Copley Hospital’s Certified Athletic Trainer, says that push-ups include many muscle groups working together during the exercise. If it has been a while since you have performed a push-up, Faraci suggests you start with modified push-ups.

Copley Hospital_Pushup Knee

To perform a full body push-up you need to be able to move between 70-75% of your bodyweight. For a person that weighs 150 pounds, that is equal to moving 105-113 pounds during the exercise. Performing a modified push-up from the knees, your body weight percentage decreases to 54-62% or 79-93 pounds of resistance. For those requiring an exercise with less resistance to move, Faraci suggests starting with a push-up against a wall or from a counter top. As with any exercise, proper body form is important in preventing injury.

Copley Hospital_Pushup Wall

The following is the basic sequence and form you should use: 

Place your weight on your hands and feet (hands and knees if performing modified push-up.) Your spine and head should be in good alignment.

Copley Hospital_Pushup Floor Up

Place your hands just slightly wider than shoulder-width apart with palms on the floor.

Lower your upper body to the floor, bending at the elbows, then rise back to the start position. Keep your head still and your eyes looking down.

Copley Hospital_Push Up_ Floor

Breath in on the way down and exhale on the way up.

Keep your abdominal muscles tight by pulling your belly button in toward your spine.

Copley provides a full range of inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation services for people of all ages and ability. Clinics in Morrisville, Stowe (in Stoweflake Mountain Resort) and Hardwick for your convenience. Contact us to learn more: 888-8303 | copleyvt.org/rehabilitation.