Tag - 3-4-50 Vermont

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Join Lamoille County Planning Commission By Becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner
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Improving Health, One Organization at a Time
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New Year! New, Tobacco-Free You! (or Family, Friend, Co-Worker or Employee)
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When Is 13 Not a Lucky Number?
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3-4-50 Vermont

Join Lamoille County Planning Commission By Becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner

By: Lea Kilvádyová

The Lamoille County Planning Commission was recently recognized by the Vermont Department of Health for their commitment to supporting healthy worksites and healthy communities.  The Lamoille County Planning Commission received a 3-4-50 certificate from the Health Department for being proud partners of the wellness initiative.

Caleb Magoon, Chair of the Lamoille County Planning Commission Board accepts the 3-4-50 Certificate of Partnership from Valerie Valcour of the Vermont Department of Health.

 

3-4-50 signifies 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor diet, and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths. 3-4-50 is a statewide effort to create an epiphany about the behaviors that lead to chronic disease in our state and to engage partners from all sectors in strategies to improve health across our state.

Caleb Magoon, Chair of the Lamoille County Planning Commission Board stated, “The Board worked hard to weave together relevant subjects, trends, and livability principles, such as health, wellness, and economic opportunity, into each chapter of the Regional Plan. “

The Regional Plan is a planning document for all of Lamoille County, which is prepared with extensive public input. The Lamoille County Planning Commission Board reviewed the 3-4-50 principles and unanimously agreed that these wellness principles align with the Regional Plan.

Valerie Valcour of the Vermont Department of Health said,” 3-4-50 Vermont partners, like the Lamoille County Planning Commission and Lamoille County Mental Health help to create healthy and thriving Vermont schools, businesses, communities and individuals. Our Partners understand the importance of community-based efforts to help create a healthy and thriving Vermont, and we are pleased to be working with them.”

Additional information on wellness in your community and becoming a 3-4-50 Vermont Partner is available at https://healthvermont.gov/3-4-50.

Improving Health, One Organization at a Time

By: Valerie Valcour

Did you know that where you live, your zip code, is important to your health? Do you think that where you work, play and learn are also important to your health? How about when you stop in that corner market for a quick snack or when you meet for church service, do you think these places impact your health too? The Vermont Department of Health says yes.

The Vermont Department of Health has added two new organizations to the list of 3-4-50 partners. There are new Tip Sheets and Sign-On forms for retailers and faith-communities. Haven’t heard of 3-4-50?

3-4-50 is a simple but powerful way to understand and communicate the overwhelming impact of chronic disease in Vermont. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors – lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use – that lead to 4 chronic diseases – cancer, heart disease/stroke, type 2 diabetes and lung disease – resulting in more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

Retail establishments, like the corner markets, can help you meet your goals for good health by displaying healthy snack options like fruit and nuts and they can keep tobacco products out of eye-sight, especially from children.

Faith-communities can set guidelines that make sure healthy foods are made available during coffee hours, potlucks and meetings. They can also create property-wide tobacco-free spaces. Having bike racks or offering physical activity options for gatherings can also help the overall health of the community.

Join the Lamoille Valley 3-4-50 Partners and sign your organization on to good health and wellness today! http://www.healthvermont.gov/3-4-50


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

New Year! New, Tobacco-Free You! (or Family, Friend, Co-Worker or Employee)

By: Alison Link

For many of us, the New Year has become a time of resolutions and goal setting. In this post, we want to share smoking and tobacco cessation stories and resources to encourage all who may be considering quitting smoking or reducing exposure to second-hand smoke. In Vermont, three behaviors – one being tobacco use – lead to four chronic diseases (cancer, heart disease, lung disease and diabetes) result in over 50% of deaths. (Learn more here.)

802 Quits

Vermont quit smoking resourceAs we know, behavior change is difficult. So what factors help those who are using tobacco make the shift in their stage of change from pre-contemplation or contemplation to action, making a quit plan and implementing it with the support they need? What follows here are a couple of personal stories of those impacted by 802 Quits.

This fall, Hiata Kirby, a Healthy Lamoille Valley staff member, was searching our website for upcoming edits, a process that led her to http://802quits.org. A smoker of 12 years, she wondered how the site worked and how it could help her. As she continued deeper into the 802 Quits website links and articles, she thought, “I can do this!” and started making a plan. She set a quit date 3 weeks away as the prompts on the site helped her to think through choosing a realistic quit date. The site also helped her plan for what she would do when having a craving and identify the nicotine replacement therapy (gum, patches, and/or lozenges) she wanted to use. She was able to place an order to have them mailed to her in time for her quit date.

This New Year’s Eve, she will be 4 months smoke-free with many thanks to her husband and son who have encouraged her to quit. It’s not easy, but Hiata reports taking lots of deep breaths, and being extra vigilant. She is grateful for the free nicotine replacement, and that it arrived in advance of her quit date. The arrival of the products was another day that she looked forward to within the process. Reflecting on her experience thus far with 802 Quits, Hiata said,

“I think the thing I liked the most about 802 Quits and quitting… and my best advice to others hoping to quit, is to make a plan. It takes a long time to break a habit…stay busy and figure out how to not have nicotine in your life. My incentive is the health part and my family.”

Hiata is not alone in this appreciation for the support and free quit products offered by 802 Quits. Casey Dewey, Development Coordinator at Green Mountain Support Services, quit recently through a class offered in conjunction with 802 Quits and Vermont Quit Partners at her workplace. She said,

“802 Quits was very helpful. It made it financially affordable to quit. It would have been cheaper in the moment to keep smoking. It was important to be able to quit with people I know and who I used to smoke with in the past. Now, we go for walks and still make the time for that few minutes break.”

Hiata and Casey both mentioned that they still take a break, just not a smoke break. Instead, it’s an outside break, often with a social component and sometimes a walk. Planning in advance for the free nicotine replacement products was very helpful for both of them, as well as the planning for the next round in advance. Whether using 802 Quits online or through a class, those connected to the program feel supported. 

Local Classes Starting in January

If you are interested in a local cessation class, two classes are starting in January. Classes run for 4 weeks and provide 8 weeks of free nicotine replacement for those interested and a free gift card once the course is completed.

Erica Coats, of CHSLV coordinates the Lamoille Valley classes and shares the importance of the 802 Quits partnership. “802 Quits provide the community with resources and education surrounding how to quit and how to get connected with the resources. 802 Quits has been a great supporter for the cessation classes here in Lamoille county, providing participants with 8 weeks of free nicotine replacement as well as quit tools to help individuals be successful in their drive to quit tobacco.”

Kate Myerson, Tobacco Cessation Specialist and a Class Facilitator, adds, “Classes are a great way to learn from others going through the same thing without fear of judgment.”

January cessation class start dates:

  • January 10th – Cambridge Family Practice 5-6pm
  • January 18th – SASH building in Morrisville 5-6pm

**If you are an employer and interested in offering a cessation class at your workplace, please contact Erica at (802) 253-9171 or Alison at alison@healthylamoillevalley.org.

Sneak peak!

What to look out for in the next months from 802 Quits website:

  • A new look and updated website launch!
  • Based on customer feedback and research, 802 Quits will become more accessible for those interested in using the resource.
  • 802 Quits will help folks take action around cessation- quit on their own and get medication to help.
  • Quit Your Way! Regardless of how an individual wants to quit… on phone, in person, online, the website will have relevant and useful information. There will be opportunities to learn what to expect with and compare the different options.
  • 802 Quits can help those interested motivate themselves, learn why they smoke and create strategies to help with that, create a quit plan, and receive information on putting a plan into action.

 


Alison Link is the Policy and Community Outreach Coordinator for Healthy Lamoille Valley, where she spends two-thirds of her time working on the new tobacco prevention grant received from the Vermont Department of Health. Alison can also be found teaching courses at Johnson State College, volunteering with restorative justice programs and supporting individuals in valuing their time, staying healthy and enhancing their leisure lifestyles through her own initiative, The Leisure Link. Alison enjoys the quality of life in Vermont and lives in Morrisville with her husband, Rabbi David Fainsilber (of the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe) and their young children.

When Is 13 Not a Lucky Number?

By: Wendy Hubbard RN, BSN, Vermont Department of Health

Many of us have heard the saying “Lucky Number 13.” When is 13 not a lucky number? Thirteen is no longer a lucky number when it is associated with the increased rates of 13 cancers. These cancers have been associated with being overweight or obese. The “Cancer and Obesity” report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on October 3rd can be found on their website.

The CDC infographic discusses what communities are doing to encourage their neighbors to increase their physical activity and get healthy foods into their daily meal plan. I would like us to take a moment and look at the resources in the Lamoille Valley. There are many activities going on and simple, no cost ways we can encourage each other to have improved health.

Families, for example, can get out and walk or bike on the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail.Find a walking buddy to encourage each other and get out there and enjoy the fall air.

Local schools encourage breakfast and offer healthy meal choices for breakfast and lunch. There are summer meal programs for children in many areas. The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program offers food benefits, nutrition education, recipes and breastfeeding supports to families that meet the eligibility requirements. You can call 888-7447 for more information on WIC services.

The 3-4-50 website has Vermont specific data along with tips and strategies to reduce obesity.

The 3 represents the 3 behaviors that are the leading causes of cancer:

  1. Tobacco use
  2. Poor diet
  3. Lack of physical exercise and obesity

These 3 behaviors contribute to 4 chronic diseases:

  1. Cancer
  2. Heart disease & stroke
  3. Type 2 diabetes
  4. Lung disease

These behaviors and chronic diseases are the cause of more than 50% of deaths in Vermont.

3-4-50 Vermont

By: Valerie Valcour

Have you heard about 3-4-50 yet? If you haven’t, you will. 3-4-50 represents 3 behaviors (tobacco use, lack of physical activity and poor diet) that can lead to 4 chronic diseases (cancer, heart disease and stroke, type 2 diabetes and lung disease) that can lead to more than 50 percent of all deaths in Vermont.

The good news about the 3-4-50 message is that good health is contagious and the Vermont Department of Health is spreading this good news along with tips and recognition for positive behaviors.

On the 3-4-50 website, we show how communities can support bike paths, sidewalks, smoke-free public spaces, farmers markets and community gardens. Employers can make it easier for employees to take physical activity breaks, support tobacco cessation efforts and add healthy options in vending machines. Schools and child-care centers can provide drinking water all day and activity breaks throughout each day. Your organization can complete a “Sign-On” form and be recognized for your efforts to make your environment healthy.

Over the next few months, I hope to see several schools, businesses and communities get recognized for their efforts because when the environment around us supports positive behavior, it’s easier for all of us to make healthy choices.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.