Category - Recipes

1
Stealth Health – Tales From the Toddler Dinner Table
2
Spring Into Wellness
3
Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes
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Healthy Pumpkin Recipes
5
Fresh Garden Salsa
6
An Easy, Balanced Meal: Turkey and Vegetable Meatloaf with Balsamic Glaze

Stealth Health – Tales From the Toddler Dinner Table

By: Julie Swank

If he had his own way, my son would subsist entirely on pancakes. In his words, “with syrup AND jam.” As a garden nutrition educator, I’m embarrassed to admit this, since I work hard to convince kids they love kale and beets over more sugar-laden food options. And here’s my own son double fisting pancakes drenched in syrup. 

I have to remember that I, as the well meaning adult in this picture, am in charge of helping my young one develop his palate to enjoy many different tastes and flavors. But a child’s love for all things carbohydrate and sugar can leave even the most determined parent feeling defeated from time to time at the dinner table. 

This is a good place to introduce the idea of stealth health, from the “if you can’t beat them, join ‘em” category of parenting advice. While it’s still important to introduce foods raw or solo for young kids to get a taste for them, sometimes you need to get creative to get all the nutrition you can into their growing bodies. I’m taking a page from my mom on this one, who had many vegetable pancake variations, most of which were not well received by my younger self. Corn, zucchini, and carrots all made appearances at the breakfast table, met with many a complaint from me to “just have normal pancakes.”

Well, here I am as an adult who loves many different kinds of veggies, so my mom’s persistence paid off. We’re in for the long haul teaching food habits to kids – food preferences are MUCH easier to shape at a young age.  However, this might not always look perfect. For example, my son tasting a bite of spinach and spitting it out onto my plate…but his excited “I tried it!” is a step in the right direction. We’ll work more on manners, but exposure to many different tastes in the toddler years will help our young ones become adventurous eaters as adults. 

Here are some fun ideas from the stealth health kitchen:

  • Pasta and pizza are often easy “wins” with kids – who doesn’t love them? Purée steamed kale or broccoli, roasted beets, or other veggies into the tomato sauce for extra nutrients. This also works for meatloaf or meatballs – add 1 cup of puréed veggies to your regular recipe. 
  • Take it from brussels sprouts, they got a lot more popular once they met bacon. Use small amounts of cheese or bacon to make a previously unpopular vegetables shine. 
  • If you’re desperate, you can always hide veggies! I often slip the kale and spinach under the cheese in a pizza. Also, grated or sliced veggies (raw or cooked) can easily be tucked into sandwiches and wraps without too much of a fuss.
  • Give in a little bit to a toddler’s love of sugar by roasting root vegetables like parsnips, carrots, and beets to bring out their natural sugars. Cut them in wedges and have “rainbow french fries”!

This pancake recipe is popular in our house and a great way to sneak some extra nutrients into breakfast without your picky eaters noticing. Enjoy! 

Carrot Apple Pancakes

  • 2 large carrots, grated
  • 1 large apple, grated
  • 1 cup plain yogurt + ½ cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 ½ cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 2 Tbs. granulated sugar
  • 1 ½ cups whole wheat flour
  • ½  tsp. cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp ginger (dried or fresh)
  • ½ cup raisins (optional)

Mix flour, baking soda, sugar, raisins, and spices together in a bowl.  Separately, whisk eggs, milk, and yogurt together and then stir in the grated carrot and apple. Mix dry ingredients into wet ingredients, being careful to not overmix (this makes pancakes tough). Fry on a pancake griddle, or in a little oil on a skillet until crispy and risen a bit. 


Julie Swank is a farmer, a school garden and nutrition educator, and most recently a mom, which has put all of her skills to the test to keep her busy two-year-old healthy and fed. She loves to connect people to their food by sharing advice from the kitchen and getting hands in the soil on the farm.  You can find her in the kitchen cooking meals for her son’s preschool, Four Seasons of Early Learning, and tending gardens in Greensboro, VT.

Spring Into Wellness

By: Deb Nevil

I don’t know about you, but this time of year always tugs at my inner gardener. I linger in a space of memories to the joy I find in delicious, locally grown produce and berries. As I watch the birds ready themselves for mating and all that the ritual of spring renewal has to offer, I dream of seeds sprouting, sap running, and the trees budding.  In Vermont, we know how quickly things change and that goes for our short growing season. I’m longing for cool misty mornings with my bare feet in the garden, long, steamy days that turn into peaceful evenings filled with music and laughter, and for summer farmers’ markets to open and the connection that brings to abundance and community.

Did you know that starting in July, just in time for peak growing season, Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets Division is opening up the Farm to Family program to our local farm stands?

This program falls under Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and supplements healthy eating choices of locally produced fruits, vegetables and plant starts for families from birth to age five. Farm to Family was originally only for farmers’ markets, but with this expansion, a broader focus on the importance of starting to eat healthy from the start helps to foster healthy habits for a lifetime. Families receive $30.00 in Farm to Family coupons in $6.00 increments. Here’s who can get support from WIC:

  • Pregant Women
  • Moms
  • Dads
  • Grandparents
  • Foster Parents
  • Step Parents
  • Guardians

“If you’re pregnant, a caregiver, or a mom with a child under age 5, you can get the right personalized support for you and your family. Caregivers with low to medium income and those who are part of other programs such as foster care, medical assistance or SNAP are eligible. Contact your local office for details.” – signupwic.com

This time of year also brings renewal and change. I try to focus on eating healthy and incorporating recipes that are easy, versatile and satisfying. I was on my social media account last night and a good friend, Kim Place-Faucher, posted a picture of a delicious salad.

Healthy spring seasonal recipe

 The funny thing was, her post asked about food blogging! Well of course, I had to share my guest blog post through Healthy Lamoille Valley and that I was writing this post for all of you. I asked if I could share her recipe and she said, “Yes!”  Here is Kim’s recipe:

  • 1 avocado
  • 1 blood orange
  • 1 Cara Cara orange
  • 1 navel
  • A small handful of fresh cilantro
  • Dress the salad with fresh-squeezed lime juice and drizzle with local honey.

This season also provides the best local maple syrup, so you could try a variation by changing out the honey with maple. Whatever your choice, I hope this finds you well and wanting to enjoy the offerings of the season. At the very least it might make mud season more tolerable.

In gratitude,

 Deb


Deb Nevil is a Boston native who grew up summering on the ocean in Marshfield, MA. Clamming, blackberry picking, gardening and homemade cooking has always been her passion. Consequently, her love for healthy, natural food and wellness has brought her to create in her hometown, Jeffersonville Farmers’ and Artisan Market. Deb was encouraged by her parents to live life on her own terms while helping others achieve their goals through neighborliness, generosity and compassion.

A mother of 4 with a M.Ed., Deb oversees the after school and summer Enrichment program as the 21st Center for Learning Coordinator at Cambridge Elementary School. Deb understands the importance of a healthy, educated and engaged community to raise positive and productive children. She is a Vermont Farmers’ Market Advisory (VTFMA) Board Member, Brand Ambassador for Kingdom Creamery of VT and coordinates the JFAM Mtn. Jam Music Series in Jeffersonville in July-August.

Deb lives in Cambridge with her family, and babies: her dogs and cats.

Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes

By: Alexandra Duquette

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American adults of all backgrounds. Many of these deaths are largely preventable through lifestyle modification. Along with exercise, diet can play a role in maintaining your heart health. Following a diet that is low in saturated fats and sodium, and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help keep your ticker ticking for many years to come.

To celebrate American Heart Month, here are a couple great recipes that your heart will appreciate!

 

Hearty Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 cup dried lentils, rinsed
  • 2 celery ribs, sliced
  • 1 small bell pepper, the color of your choice, chopped
  • ¼ cup uncooked brown rice
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ cup tomato paste

Directions:

  1. In a large saucepan, combine all ingredients except tomato paste. Bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1-1.5 hours or until lentils and rice are tender.
  3. Add the tomato paste and still until blended. Cook for 10-15 minutes more. Discard bay leaf.

Serves 6

Nutritional Information per serving:

Calories: 206, Fat: 1.4 grams, Saturated Fat: 0 grams, Cholesterol: 0 grams, Carbohydrate: 36 grams, Dietary Fiber: 12.6 grams, Protein 12.9 grams

 

Salmon Burger with Bok Choy, Ginger, and Lemongrass

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. Salmon Filet or Canned Salmon (packed in water)
  • 3 cups Bok Choy (or any dark leafy green) chopped finely
  • 3 Scallions, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. Ginger, finely grated
  • 1 Large Egg White
  • 1 Tbsp. Dried Lemongrass
  • 1 Tbsp. Low-Sodium Soy Sauce

Directions:

  1. Cut salmon into ¼ inch dice (or use canned salmon), stir into mixture of bok choy, scallions, ginger, and lemongrass until combined.
  2. Beat together egg white and soy sauce in a small bowl and stir into salmon mixture.
  3. Form into four patties that are ½ inch thick.
  4. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add 1 Tbsp. of olive oil to cover bottom of skillet. Add salmon patties, cooking for approximately 3-4 minutes per side.
  5. Serve hot. These burgers can be served over a bed of salad greens for a low carb option!

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories: 399(285 without burger bun), Fat: 21.9 grams, Saturated Fat: 3.1 grams, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Carbohydrate 39.9g (19 grams without bun), Dietary Fiber: 4.1 grams, Protein: 12.1 grams

 


Alexandra Duquette is the Clinical Dietician for Copley Hospital, where she sees inpatients and outpatients daily. As a former pastry chef, she has realigned her career to aid people in enjoy food while keeping their bodies healthy and strong.

Healthy Pumpkin Recipes

By: Alexandra Duquette

 

 

The season of the pumpkin is upon us and with that comes pie, lattes, beer, and even cereal flavored with that sweet, earthy gourd. While these can all be delicious, they are hard on our wallets, and even harder on our waistlines. And with fall marking the beginning of the holiday season where many of us see the numbers on the scale slowly creep up, why not start out on a positive note with some healthier recipes featuring those favorite fall flavors?

Turkey Pumpkin Chili

This twist on a cold weather classic is packed with protein and fiber that is sure to fill you up and keep you warm when the temperature starts to drop.  You could easily make this recipe in a slow-cooker for a “ready when you are” dinner.

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • 1 pound lean ground turkey (15% fat)
  • 2/3 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup green pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 can kidney beans, drained and rinsed (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can great northern beans, drained and rinsed (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can solid-pack pumpkin (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can crushed tomatoes (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can chicken broth, low sodium (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups) (See Notes)
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 package taco seasoning mix (1.25 ounces) (See Notes)

Directions:

  1. Pour oil into a 4 quart (or larger) saucepan.
  2. Add ground turkey, onion, green pepper, and garlic.
  3. Cook and stir, breaking meat apart until meat is browned and vegetables are tender.
  4. Stir in the beans, pumpkin, tomatoes, broth, water, brown sugar, and taco seasoning.
  5. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1 hour.
  6. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

Notes:

  • Broth can be canned or made using bouillon. For each cup of broth, use 1 cup very hot water and 1 teaspoon or cube bouillon.
  • For lower sodium, use a low-sodium or salt-free seasoning mix.

Serving size: 1 cup, Calories per Serving: 220, Total Fat: 4.5g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol 25mg, Sodium 430mg, Total Carbohydrate: 29g, Dietary Fiber: 9g, Sugars 7g, Protein: 17g

 

 

Low Fat Pumpkin Bread

A perfect lightened-up version of a true fall favorite.

Ingredients:

  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • 2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree 9Canned or home-roasted)
  • 1 cup p0akced brown sugar
  • 1 cup dried plum puree (see notes)
  • 1 cup sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg.
  3. Add the eggs and pumpkin, stir until mixed together.
  4. In a large bowl, blend that plum puree, brown sugar, and sugar.
  5. Lightly coat an 8 ½ x 4 ½ -inch loaf pan with cooking spray or oil and set aside.
  6. Add dry ingredients to the plum mixture. Stir only until the dry ingredients become moistened. Be careful not to overmix.
  7. Pour batter into loaf pan and spread into corners.
  8. Bake for about 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted into the center of the load comes out clean.
  9. Remove from oven and let cool in pan for 10 minutes.
  10. Remove from pan and let cool completely on wire rack. Slice to serve.
  11. Wrap in plastic or foil and store for several days or freeze for up to one month.

Notes:

  • To make the dried plum puree: Combine 2/3 cup pitted dried plums (4 ounces) and 3 tablespoons water in a blender. Blend until finely chopped.
  • If you don’t have dried plums on hand, try using applesauce or plum baby food.

Serving size: 1 ½ inch slice, Calories per Serving: 120, Total Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 0g, Cholesterol 25mg, Sodium 120mg, Total Carbohydrate: 28g, Dietary Fiber: 1g, Sugars 17g, Protein: 2g

 

Recipes from Oregon State University’s “FoodHero.org.”


Alexandra Duquette is the Clinical Dietician for Copley Hospital, where she sees inpatients and outpatients daily. As a former pastry chef, she has realigned her career to aid people in enjoy food while keeping their bodies healthy and strong.

Fresh Garden Salsa

Have you read Mary L. Collins’ blog post about Lamoille Home Health & Hospice’s Wellness Garden? Aside from providing an opportunity to support physical and mental wellness, gardens provide fresh, healthy produce that can be used in your favorite recipes.

Here’s a great summer recipe for Fresh Tomato Salsa, courtesy of Mary L. Collins and Lamoille Home Health & Hospice.

An Easy, Balanced Meal: Turkey and Vegetable Meatloaf with Balsamic Glaze

By: David Vinick

For my first blog post I would like to share a favorite comfort food recipe that is easy to do and tastes great. This Turkey and Vegetable Meatloaf with Balsamic Glaze makes a good part of a balanced meal. It only takes about 20 minutes of prep time, and it also makes for great leftovers.

Turkey and Vegetable Meatloaf with Balsamic Glaze

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons extra –virgin olive oil
  • 1 small zucchini, finely diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, finely diced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, finely diced
  • 5 cloves of garlic, smashed to a paste with coarse salt
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 1 large egg, lighten beaten
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme ( or dried)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 ½ pounds ground turkey ( 90% lean)
  • 1 cup panko ( coarse Japanese breadcrumbs ) or regular breadcrumbs
  • ½ cup grated Romano or Parmesan cheese
  • ¾ cup ketchup
  • ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Heat the oil in a large saute pan over high heat. Add the zucchini, bell peppers, garlic paste and ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper and cook until the vegetables are almost soft, about 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. Wisk the egg and fresh herbs in a large bowl. Add the turkey, panko grated cheese, ½ cup ketchup, 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar and the cooled vegetables, mix until just combined.
  3. Gently press the mixture into a 9-by-5- inch loaf pan. Whisk the remaining ¼ cup ketchup. ¼ cup balsamic vinegar and ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes in a small bowl; brush the mixture over the entire loaf. Bake for 1 to 1 ¼ hours. Let rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

8 servings: per serving Calories 270; Fat 14g (sat. 4.2g Mono 6.3g Poly 3.1g) Cholesterol 104 mg; Sodium 451 mg : Carbohydrate 16g: Fiber 1g ; Protein 20g

What are your favorite healthy recipes? Share them in the comments section!


David Vinick is the Director of Nutritional Services at Copley Hospital. The department serves 110,000 meals a year to patients, staff, and visitors.

David began his career as a Food Service Manager at Copley Hospital 30 years ago. He was an owner, manager, and chef of Hilary’s Restaurant and Green Mountain Catering in Morrisville for 24 years. David spent six years as a Sous Chef at Copley Woodlands, an independent retirement community in Stowe, before returning to Copley Hospital.

David writes about his love of food and how to incorporate nutritious, local foods into your diet. He’ll share healthy recipes, as well as cooking tips and trends.