Category - Nutrition

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Considerate Festive Cooking for Everyone: Special Diets/Allergies
2
The Power of Habit
3
Fabulous Fiber!
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WIC Offers Fresh Produce From Local Farms
5
10 Tips to Eat Healthy During Summer Travel
6
Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes
7
When Is 13 Not a Lucky Number?
8
Healthy Pumpkin Recipes
9
WIC & Gluten-Free Living
10
6 Mindful Eating Tips

Considerate Festive Cooking for Everyone: Special Diets/Allergies

By: Stacy Wein, Librarian, Copley Health Sciences Library*

During the holidays we often get together with others for parties or large family dinners. Planning the menus and cooking can be great fun until you remember Aunt Sally has a nut allergy and John has a gluten allergy. There is sure to be someone who is vegan or diabetic. How do you prepare a delicious and safe feast for all? Don’t worry, it can still be fun to plan a menu.

Hosting a festive gathering should be welcoming to all. Some of your guests may have dietary restrictions by choice, religion or culture, lifestyle choices, or it might be a matter of life and death. Make sure your guests know you are aware some might have dietary restrictions. Since you want everyone to enjoy themselves and you want to provide a safe menu, here are some suggestions and links to online resources to assist you in creating a deliciously safe feast for all.

  • Get to know your guests’ dietary restrictions. They might be able to make some suggestions or provide helpful information.
  • In the menu, be sure to list the ingredients for each dish. You might want to save the labels of the purchased items for the dish for reference.
  • Simplify! Keep recipes very basic. Stick to a little salt and pepper and provide other seasonings and ingredients, like nuts, to be available so guests can season their own serving.
  • Remember to wash hands, cooking utensils, and surfaces often. This prevents cross-contamination. You might also prepare dishes on different days.
  • And there is always the buffet or “build your own” option (like a taco bar) where people prepare their own from available options.

More Resources:

*This article was modified with permission from an article written by Carolyn Martin, MLS, AHIP,  Consumer Health Coordinator with University of Washington Health Sciences Library.

The Power of Habit

By: Rorie Dunphey

Have you ever ‘decided’ to make changes to your health (lose weight, quit smoking, start exercising…), only to be disappointed in yourself days or weeks later having ‘failed’? You may feel disappointed in yourself due to a ‘lack of willpower’ or simply feel overwhelmed by how hard it is to change. In fact, change is not a ‘decision’, but rather it is a process that takes time and patience.

Don’t underestimate the power of habit! Habit formation (whether starting or stopping a behavior) is both physical and psychological. Our brain actually creates neural pathways for new behaviors. Our body and mind are in the habit of behaving in a certain way, and it can take time for a new habit to form or an old habit to diminish.

Change is a process, not an event. Here are some tips to help create healthy habits:

  • Practice patience. Research tells us that it takes as much as 180 days to truly let go of an old habit and adopt a new one. So hang in there!
  • Stop beating yourself up! Putting yourself down if you find yourself engaged in the old habit can damage our confidence. Instead, practice positive thinking and be compassionate with yourself.
  • Celebrate catching yourself. Instead of putting yourself down for ‘being weak’, congratulate yourself for being aware. Each time you catch yourself and become aware, you will build confidence and motivation.
  • Use structures to help remind yourself about the new behavior or goal. For example, put sticky notes on the bathroom mirror, set an alarm on your phone, or link the new behavior to something you already do (like walking right after breakfast).
  • Involve others in your goal. Let family, friends or co-workers know you are working to change. Enlist support and feedback to help. Find a partner with a similar goal to help motivate each other!
  • Work with a health coach or healthcare provider. They can provide support and accountability during the process of habit formation.

Don’t wait until New Years to make healthy changes in your life. Habits can be changed or created any time of year!


Rorie Dunphey works under Vermont’s Blueprint for Health as the RN Chronic Care Coordinator at Family Practice Associates in Cambridge. She works one-on-one with people and also leads classes to promote health and help people better manage their chronic diseases. She also assists patients in accessing community and state resources to better coordinate their health and wellness needs. Rorie has a particular passion for promoting a healthy diet and exercise routine to inspire people to live their best life.

 

Fabulous Fiber!

By: Rorie Dunphey

Health Benefits of Fiber_Whole Grains

Why is FIBER important?

A fiber rich diet has many benefits to a healthy lifestyle. It can reduce your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as several kinds of cancer. It also can improve cholesterol, lower blood pressure, regulate digestion and help with weight loss. With farmers markets and CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture) in full swing now, eating locally produced, fiber-rich foods is both easy and delicious!

What is FIBER?

There are 2 kinds: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber can help control blood sugar and cholesterol, while insoluble fiber adds bulk to our colon and can act like a brush, helping food pass through the digestive tract more efficiently. Fiber can be found in fruits, veggies, whole grains, nuts and beans.

What is a WHOLE GRAIN?

A whole grain has 3 layers: the fiber-rich bran or outer layer, the endosperm or middle layer, and the germ or inner layer. Whole grains are not only rich in fiber, but also are loaded with nutrients. Some examples include whole grain breads, oats, corn meal, bulgur, quinoa, brown rice, farro and popcorn. A refined grain is processed leaving only the middle or endosperm layer is left, thus removing much of the beneficial fiber and nutrients.

How much is ENOUGH?  It is generally recommended that people consume 25 to 38 grams of fiber each day. Add fiber to your diet slowly, over a few weeks. Too much too fast can cause bloating or gas.

How can I add more FIBER to my diet?

  • Eat 5-10 servings of vegetables and fruits per day, ½ cup of whole grains (brown rice, whole grain bread), ¼ cup nuts, ½ cooked veggies, 1 cup of fruit
  • Read labels! Choose breads, cereals, pasta and crackers that list ‘Whole Grain’ as the first ingredient. Look for the ‘Whole Grain’ stamp on the package and beware of deceptive marketing. ‘Multi Grain’, ‘wheat’ and ‘enriched flour’ do NOT mean whole grain. Products with at least 10% of the ‘percent daily value’ are generally fiber-rich foods.
  • Eat more recipes with beans, barley, lentils, quinoa, bulgur or brown rice
  • Eat oatmeal or whole grain cereal for breakfast
  • Buy unprocessed foods, as processing often removes the fiber.

How do you sneak more fiber into your diet?


Rorie Dunphey works under Vermont’s Blueprint for Health as the RN Chronic Care Coordinator at Family Practice Associates in Cambridge. She works one-on-one with people and also leads classes to promote health and help people better manage their chronic diseases. She also assists patients in accessing community and state resources to better coordinate their health and wellness needs. Rorie has a particular passion for promoting a healthy diet and exercise routine to inspire people to live their best life.

WIC Offers Fresh Produce From Local Farms

By: Nancy Segreto, WIC Nutritionist, Vermont Department of Health

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)  provides wholesome food, nutrition education and community support for income-eligible women who are pregnant or post-partum (including fathers and caregivers), infants, and children up to 5 years old. Our community now has three clinic locations, located in Johnson, Hardwick, and Morrisville.

In addition to the standard food offered by WIC, each summer the Morrisville WIC office distributes coupons worth $30 – $60 to families. These “Farm to Family” coupons can be used as money to buy produce from participating farmers at Vermont Farmer’s Markets, from July through the end of October. Families can meet the farmer who grew their food, tasting new foods while developing an appreciation for fresh, local whole foods. This program also supports Vermont farmers who receive 100% of the coupon value.

WIC recently partnered with Lamoille Valley Gleaning to offer monthly “WIC Gleaning Taste Tests” under our tent in the Morrisville WIC office parking lot. For those who may not know, “gleaning” is the gathering of extra crops from the fields after the harvest. Gleaning helps keep fresh, wholesome food in our community and supports a healthy food system. Past events have offered freshly harvested green beans, zucchini, lettuce, baby kale, arugula and more. Taste-tests and recipes are provided with themes such as pasta salads, soups, baby foods, and holiday inspirations.

The next WIC Gleaning Taste Tests will take place August 2, September 13, October 11, and November 8, from 2- 3:00pm at the WIC office (63 Processional Dr, Morrisville).

Families with Medicaid or Dr. Dynasaur insurance are income eligible for WIC. Know a family who might qualify for WIC? Tell them about us!

To connect with WIC today, visit: healthvermont.gov/wic or call 800-649-4357 or 802-888-7447 (Morrisville). WIC is an equal opportunity provider. For more information about WIC, visit the Health Department website at http://www.healthvermont.gov/local-health-offices/morrisville/wic-services.

10 Tips to Eat Healthy During Summer Travel

By: Rorie Dunphey

The weather is finally improving and it is finally beginning to feel like summer. For many of us, summer means adventures and traveling. Is it possible to eat healthy when we are on the road having fun? Yes! Here are 10 simple tips to eating healthy when away from home;

  • Consider your drink – Choose water, unsweetened tea or drinks with no added sugars. Avoid drinking calories.
  • Savor a salad – Start your meal with a salad packed with vegetables to help you feel satisfied sooner. Ask for dressing on the side and use a small amount.
  • Share a meal or dish – Divide a main entrée between family and friends. Ask for small plates for everyone at the table.
  • Select from the sides – Order a side dish or appetizer as a meal. It is usually more than enough food!
  • Pack your snacks – Pack a cooler with ready-to-eat fruit, vegetables or unsalted nuts to eat on road trips. It can help you avoid stopping for junk food when you need to stop to fill the gas tank.
  • Fill your plate with vegetables and fruits – Stir-fries, kabobs or vegetarian options can be healthy and delicious. Order meals without gravy or sauces. Select fruits for dessert.
  • Compare calories, fat and sodium – Many menus now have nutritional information. Look for items that are lower in calories, saturated fat and sodium. You can also ask your server about for healthier options.
  • Pass on the buffet – Order individual items from the menu and avoid ‘all you can eat’ buffets. Steamed, grilled or broiled dishes usually have fewer calories than fried or sautéed foods.
  • Get your whole grains – Ask for 100% whole grain bread, rolls and pasta when eating sandwiches, burgers or entrees.
  • Quit the ‘clean plate club’ – Be mindful of how full you feel and stop eating when you have had enough. Slow down and savor each bite. Pack leftovers away immediately to avoid nibbling and refrigerate them for tomorrow’s meal.

It can be often be challenging to eat balanced and nutritious foods when away from home, but with a little effort and planning, you can still have fun and be healthy. Enjoy and safe traveling!


Rorie Dunphey works under Vermont’s Blueprint for Health as the RN Chronic Care Coordinator at Family Practice Associates in Cambridge. She works one-on-one with people and also leads classes to promote health and help people better manage their chronic diseases. She also assists patients in accessing community and state resources to better coordinate their health and wellness needs. Rorie has a particular passion for promoting a healthy diet and exercise routine to inspire people to live their best life.

Try Out These Heart-Healthy Recipes

By: Alexandra Duquette

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American adults of all backgrounds. Many of these deaths are largely preventable through lifestyle modification. Along with exercise, diet can play a role in maintaining your heart health. Following a diet that is low in saturated fats and sodium, and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help keep your ticker ticking for many years to come.

To celebrate American Heart Month, here are a couple great recipes that your heart will appreciate!

 

Hearty Vegetable and Lentil Soup

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups water
  • 3 cups low sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 3 medium carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 cup dried lentils, rinsed
  • 2 celery ribs, sliced
  • 1 small bell pepper, the color of your choice, chopped
  • ¼ cup uncooked brown rice
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ cup tomato paste

Directions:

  1. In a large saucepan, combine all ingredients except tomato paste. Bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1-1.5 hours or until lentils and rice are tender.
  3. Add the tomato paste and still until blended. Cook for 10-15 minutes more. Discard bay leaf.

Serves 6

Nutritional Information per serving:

Calories: 206, Fat: 1.4 grams, Saturated Fat: 0 grams, Cholesterol: 0 grams, Carbohydrate: 36 grams, Dietary Fiber: 12.6 grams, Protein 12.9 grams

 

Salmon Burger with Bok Choy, Ginger, and Lemongrass

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. Salmon Filet or Canned Salmon (packed in water)
  • 3 cups Bok Choy (or any dark leafy green) chopped finely
  • 3 Scallions, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. Ginger, finely grated
  • 1 Large Egg White
  • 1 Tbsp. Dried Lemongrass
  • 1 Tbsp. Low-Sodium Soy Sauce

Directions:

  1. Cut salmon into ¼ inch dice (or use canned salmon), stir into mixture of bok choy, scallions, ginger, and lemongrass until combined.
  2. Beat together egg white and soy sauce in a small bowl and stir into salmon mixture.
  3. Form into four patties that are ½ inch thick.
  4. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add 1 Tbsp. of olive oil to cover bottom of skillet. Add salmon patties, cooking for approximately 3-4 minutes per side.
  5. Serve hot. These burgers can be served over a bed of salad greens for a low carb option!

Nutritional Information per serving

Calories: 399(285 without burger bun), Fat: 21.9 grams, Saturated Fat: 3.1 grams, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Carbohydrate 39.9g (19 grams without bun), Dietary Fiber: 4.1 grams, Protein: 12.1 grams

 


Alexandra Duquette is the Clinical Dietician for Copley Hospital, where she sees inpatients and outpatients daily. As a former pastry chef, she has realigned her career to aid people in enjoy food while keeping their bodies healthy and strong.

When Is 13 Not a Lucky Number?

By: Wendy Hubbard RN, BSN, Vermont Department of Health

Many of us have heard the saying “Lucky Number 13.” When is 13 not a lucky number? Thirteen is no longer a lucky number when it is associated with the increased rates of 13 cancers. These cancers have been associated with being overweight or obese. The “Cancer and Obesity” report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on October 3rd can be found on their website.

The CDC infographic discusses what communities are doing to encourage their neighbors to increase their physical activity and get healthy foods into their daily meal plan. I would like us to take a moment and look at the resources in the Lamoille Valley. There are many activities going on and simple, no cost ways we can encourage each other to have improved health.

Families, for example, can get out and walk or bike on the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail.Find a walking buddy to encourage each other and get out there and enjoy the fall air.

Local schools encourage breakfast and offer healthy meal choices for breakfast and lunch. There are summer meal programs for children in many areas. The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program offers food benefits, nutrition education, recipes and breastfeeding supports to families that meet the eligibility requirements. You can call 888-7447 for more information on WIC services.

The 3-4-50 website has Vermont specific data along with tips and strategies to reduce obesity.

The 3 represents the 3 behaviors that are the leading causes of cancer:

  1. Tobacco use
  2. Poor diet
  3. Lack of physical exercise and obesity

These 3 behaviors contribute to 4 chronic diseases:

  1. Cancer
  2. Heart disease & stroke
  3. Type 2 diabetes
  4. Lung disease

These behaviors and chronic diseases are the cause of more than 50% of deaths in Vermont.

Healthy Pumpkin Recipes

By: Alexandra Duquette

 

 

The season of the pumpkin is upon us and with that comes pie, lattes, beer, and even cereal flavored with that sweet, earthy gourd. While these can all be delicious, they are hard on our wallets, and even harder on our waistlines. And with fall marking the beginning of the holiday season where many of us see the numbers on the scale slowly creep up, why not start out on a positive note with some healthier recipes featuring those favorite fall flavors?

Turkey Pumpkin Chili

This twist on a cold weather classic is packed with protein and fiber that is sure to fill you up and keep you warm when the temperature starts to drop.  You could easily make this recipe in a slow-cooker for a “ready when you are” dinner.

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • 1 pound lean ground turkey (15% fat)
  • 2/3 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup green pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 can kidney beans, drained and rinsed (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can great northern beans, drained and rinsed (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can solid-pack pumpkin (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can crushed tomatoes (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups)
  • 1 can chicken broth, low sodium (15 ounce or 1 ¾ cups) (See Notes)
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1 package taco seasoning mix (1.25 ounces) (See Notes)

Directions:

  1. Pour oil into a 4 quart (or larger) saucepan.
  2. Add ground turkey, onion, green pepper, and garlic.
  3. Cook and stir, breaking meat apart until meat is browned and vegetables are tender.
  4. Stir in the beans, pumpkin, tomatoes, broth, water, brown sugar, and taco seasoning.
  5. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 1 hour.
  6. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

Notes:

  • Broth can be canned or made using bouillon. For each cup of broth, use 1 cup very hot water and 1 teaspoon or cube bouillon.
  • For lower sodium, use a low-sodium or salt-free seasoning mix.

Serving size: 1 cup, Calories per Serving: 220, Total Fat: 4.5g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Cholesterol 25mg, Sodium 430mg, Total Carbohydrate: 29g, Dietary Fiber: 9g, Sugars 7g, Protein: 17g

 

 

Low Fat Pumpkin Bread

A perfect lightened-up version of a true fall favorite.

Ingredients:

  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • 2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree 9Canned or home-roasted)
  • 1 cup p0akced brown sugar
  • 1 cup dried plum puree (see notes)
  • 1 cup sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg.
  3. Add the eggs and pumpkin, stir until mixed together.
  4. In a large bowl, blend that plum puree, brown sugar, and sugar.
  5. Lightly coat an 8 ½ x 4 ½ -inch loaf pan with cooking spray or oil and set aside.
  6. Add dry ingredients to the plum mixture. Stir only until the dry ingredients become moistened. Be careful not to overmix.
  7. Pour batter into loaf pan and spread into corners.
  8. Bake for about 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted into the center of the load comes out clean.
  9. Remove from oven and let cool in pan for 10 minutes.
  10. Remove from pan and let cool completely on wire rack. Slice to serve.
  11. Wrap in plastic or foil and store for several days or freeze for up to one month.

Notes:

  • To make the dried plum puree: Combine 2/3 cup pitted dried plums (4 ounces) and 3 tablespoons water in a blender. Blend until finely chopped.
  • If you don’t have dried plums on hand, try using applesauce or plum baby food.

Serving size: 1 ½ inch slice, Calories per Serving: 120, Total Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 0g, Cholesterol 25mg, Sodium 120mg, Total Carbohydrate: 28g, Dietary Fiber: 1g, Sugars 17g, Protein: 2g

 

Recipes from Oregon State University’s “FoodHero.org.”


Alexandra Duquette is the Clinical Dietician for Copley Hospital, where she sees inpatients and outpatients daily. As a former pastry chef, she has realigned her career to aid people in enjoy food while keeping their bodies healthy and strong.

WIC & Gluten-Free Living

By: Nancy Segreto, BS, Nutritionist, Vermont Department of Health, Morrisville

WIC in Morrisville office recently offered a class on Gluten-Free Living in partnership with the Morrisville Co-op. WIC  provides nutrition education as well as healthcare referrals and supplemental foods for income-eligible pregnant, breastfeeding, and non-breastfeeding postpartum women, and to infants and children up to age five. WIC offers wellness classes and activities that are often open to the public, free of charge.

The class focused on simplifying the process of planning, shopping and cooking gluten-free, as well as sharing basic facts that could clear up common misconceptions. Participants played a ‘Fact or Fiction’ sorting game, sampled delicious healthy gluten-free foods and went home with mini binders filled with tips, recipes, planners and a free gluten-free cookbook for busy people on a budget.

What’s all the craze about eating gluten-free?

Why are so many people choosing to be gluten-free? Are gluten-free foods healthy? Is there a roadmap for navigating the myriad of gluten-free foods on the market? What is the difference between food allergies, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity? How do we sort gluten-free fact from fiction?

Gluten is a protein found naturally in wheat, barley, and rye. It is also used as a filler to improve texture and is found in many processed foods. People who have been diagnosed with celiac disease or with non-celiac gluten sensitivity must follow a gluten-free diet. Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a gluten-free diet. Fortunately, a gluten-free diet will improve symptoms, according to a 2008 Journal of the American Dietetic Association (now Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics) article.

How do you plan a gluten-free meal?

MyPlate is the latest USDA nutrition guide, a pie chart (plate) depicting a place setting divided into five food groups:  

  • 50% vegetables and fruits (mostly vegetables)
  • 20% protein
  • 30% whole grains, with additional healthy fats and dairy. 

To become gluten-free only the whole grains section needs to be adjusted, choosing grains such as quinoa, rice, millet, teff, and gluten-free oats instead of wheat, barley, and rye. WIC offers brown rice, corn tortillas, and gluten-free breakfast cereals as alternatives to whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta and breakfast cereals made with gluten.

 

Traditional Diet Whole Grains Gluten Free Whole Grains
Wheat, barley, rye
Rice, quinoa, millet, teff, oats, corn Rice, quinoa, millet, teff, GF oats, corn
Baked goods- all (use sparingly) Baked goods with GF flour only (use sparingly)

 

Myths and Misconceptions

Avoid the gluten-free processed food traps! That chocolate cupcake is not good for you. Gluten-free processed baked goods usually have more sugars, carbohydrates, and additives than their wheat counterparts. These items should be used sparingly as a treat or when everyone else is eating the pizza or party cake, and the gluten intolerant person wants to join in.

If you suspect you have celiac or NCGS, experts recommend being screened by a healthcare provider. If you try a gluten-free diet, stick with whole foods and grains and use baked goods sparingly. The Celiac Foundation website has a wealth of resources. You can also check out the Morrisville Department of Health Facebook page for upcoming scheduled classes and events.

6 Mindful Eating Tips

By: Rorie Dunphey

When we are mindful, we are aware of the present moment without judgment. When it comes to eating, being mindful helps us tune into our body’s cues so we can hear more clearly when we are hungry or full.  Many social and environmental factors can stand in the way of being able to listen to our bodies. Mindfulness helps us break free from long standing habits by examining thoughts and feelings that affect how, why and when we eat (or don’t eat!)

Here are some ideas to be a more mindful:

Shift out of Autopilot Eating: What did you have for breakfast? Be honest. Many people eat the same thing day in and day out. Notice whether you are stuck in any kind of rut or routine.  It can help to keep a food log to become more aware.

Take Mindful Bites: Did you ever eat an entire plate of food and not taste one single bite? Bring all your senses to the dinner table to experience each bite from start to finish. Breathe in the aroma of a fresh loaf of bread, notice the texture of yogurt on your tongue and truly taste each mouthful.

Attentive Eating: Sure, you’re busy and have a lot ‘on your plate.’  It is hard to make eating a priority rather than an option or side task. If you get the urge for a snack while doing your homework or studying, stop and take a break instead, and give eating 100% of your attention. Try to avoid multitasking while you eat. When you eat, just eat.

Mindfully Check In: Ask yourself, ‘How hungry am I on a scale of one to ten?’ Gauging your hunger level is a little like taking your temperature. Each time you eat, ask yourself, ‘Am I physically hungry? Am I eating out of habit? Am I eating because of an emotion like stress or boredom? Aim to eat until you are satisfied, leaving yourself neither stuffed nor starving.

Thinking Mindfully: Observe any critical or judging thoughts like ‘I’m so stupid, why did I eat that!’ Just because you think negative thoughts doesn’t mean you need to act on them. Negative thoughts can trigger overeating or stop you from making healthy choices. Remember: A thought is just a thought, not a fact, and you can choose how to respond to thoughts without judgment. Be kind to yourself!


Rorie Dunphey works under Vermont’s Blueprint for Health as the RN Chronic Care Coordinator at Family Practice Associates in Cambridge. She works one-on-one with people and also leads classes to promote health and help people better manage their chronic diseases. She also assists patients in accessing community and state resources to better coordinate their health and wellness needs. Rorie has a particular passion for promoting a healthy diet and exercise routine to inspire people to live their best life.