Category - Department of Health in Morrisville

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The Global Big Latch On – Saturday August 6th, 2016
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2016 Global Latch On
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e-WIC is Live in Morrisville!
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3-4-50 Lamoille
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Walkable Communitites
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Valerie Valcour, Department of Health in Morrisville

The Global Big Latch On – Saturday August 6th, 2016

By: Valerie Valcour

The Big Latch On

WE ARE ON THE MAP! During International World Breastfeeding Week, August 1-7 (this week!) the Lamoille Family Center and the Vermont Department of Health are partnering to host the 2016 Global Big Latch On. We will be joining other registered locations around the world celebrating breastfeeding. Women and their children will gather together to breastfeed and offer peer-to-peer support. Friends, family and community members are encouraged to join in this celebration to show their support for breastfeeding.

This free event will be held on Saturday, August 6th from 10:00-11:00 a.m. at Lamoille Family Center (480 Cady’s Falls Road, Morrisville, VT). Light refreshments will be provided. If you plan on attending, please RSVP to 888-5229 x141.

Some of the goals of the Big Latch On are to:

  • Help communities positively support breastfeeding in public places.
  • Raise awareness of breastfeeding support and knowledge available locally and globally.
  • Make breastfeeding a normal part of day-to-day life at a local community level.

The Big Latch On has grown from two countries participating in 2010 to 28 countries participating in 2015. There could be over 15,000 participating breastfeeding women and children this year!

Please consider attending this community event. Reach out to Carol Lang-Godin at the Lamoille Family Center 888-5229 x141 if you have questions. We hope to see you there!


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

2016 Global Latch On

By: Leah Hollenberger

The Big Latch On

We have a breastfeeding mother and child in the Copley Hospital lobby 24/7 this week to help share an important message. Granted, the mother and child are made of cardboard, but the message they share is very much alive: breast is best. Why this week? It is World Breastfeeding Week and the focus is on raising awareness and support of breastfeeding throughout our community.

Why is Breastfeeding Important?

  • Breast milk contains the right balance of nutrients for infants.
  • Nutrients in breast milk may help protect infants against some common childhood illnesses and infections.
  • It may also help the mother’s health. Certain types of cancer may occur less often in mothers who have breastfed their babies.

Copley Hospital’s Birthing Center and The Women’s Center offers certified lactation support and breastfeeding counseling.  You can call them for information at 888-8100.

The Vermont Department of Health and the Lamoille Family Center are celebrating World Breastfeeding Week (August 1-7) with:

2016 Global Big Latch On
Aug. 6 10:00am-11:00am

at The Lamoille Family Center

Women and their children will gather to breastfeed and offer peer-to-peer support. Friends and family are encouraged to join in this celebration to show their support for breastfeeding. If you are currently breastfeeding and would like to attend this free event, please RSVP to 888-5229 x141 by August 4th.

The Big Latch On aims to protect, promote and support breastfeeding families by:

  • Raise awareness of breastfeeding support and knowledge available locally and globally.
  • Help communities positively support breastfeeding in public places.
  • Make breastfeeding as normal part of day-to-day life at a local community level.
  • Increase support for women who breastfeed – women are supported by their partners, family and their communities.
  • Ensure communities have the resources to advocate for coordinated appropriate and accessible breastfeeding support services.

Additional local resources are available in support of breastfeeding. There are also a number of resources online; a list is included on the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s MedLine site.


Leah Hollenberger is the Vice President of Marketing, Development, and Community Relations for Copley Hospital. A former award-winning TV and Radio producer, she is the mother of two and lives in Morrisville. Her free time is spent volunteering, cooking, playing outdoors, and producing textile arts. Leah writes about community events, preventive care, and assorted ideas to help one make healthy choices.

e-WIC is Live in Morrisville!

By: Valerie Valcour

Vermont eWIC

The USDA Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program is now up to 21st century standards in Vermont! Since 1973, the program has provided income-eligible families with nutrition education and counseling as well as food prescriptions with nutrients targeted to improve health outcomes. Over 800 families are enrolled in the program through the Morrisville District of the Vermont Department of Health which includes Lamoille County as well as Hardwick, Greensboro, Craftsbury, Stannard, and Woodbury. In February 2016, the Morrisville District Office began the transition from home delivery of foods to an electronic debit card to use at the grocery store, known as e-WIC

Perhaps the most exciting advantage of the transition has been the increase in the variety of foods available to families. With home deliveries, families used to receive only one or two brands of each kind of food. Now, there are more gluten-free, whole grain and cereal options; and some organic foods including soymilk and tofu, legumes, pasta, yogurt, infant cereals, fruits and vegetables. Local foods such as La Panciata bread from Northfield, Vermont Soy tofu, and yogurt from Butterworks Farm are included. Families also receive foods when they need them instead of on a twice-per-month fixed schedule, increasing convenience. Because each participant receives a prescription of a specified quantity of food, families do not need to worry about the costs of most their WIC-eligible foods while they are shopping. Anne Farley, mother of two from Wolcott said, “It’s nice to have choices and to be able to purchase things as I need them, rather than having to store larger quantities from the delivery. I have to go to the grocery store anyway, since WIC is supplemental, and I am able to get more of a variety in the store.” Rather than foods being left on the doorstep, many families appreciate being able to shop with a card. Farley said, “If you’re at all sensitive to others knowing you receive WIC benefits…now that most of the bugs are worked out at the stores, it’s not too conspicuous with the card.”

The WIC card may be used at major supermarkets in Vermont and some smaller stores including Sterling Market in Johnson, Tops in Hardwick, the Eden General Store, and Mac’s Market in Stowe. Families may identify WIC-eligible foods multiple ways. A smartphone app called WIC Shopper allows a quick scan of any UPC code to determine eligibility. There is also a user-friendly food guide booklet available at grocery stores and WIC offices listing the brands and sizes. For spur-of-the-moment shopping trips, the labels on store shelves with the WIC symbol identifying allowed foods are helpful. Staff are dedicated to educating families so that they may have positive experiences while shopping for their WIC foods.

Free classes on oral health, nutrition, or physical activity are offered each month, often via partnerships with local programs and organizations such as Head Start, Building Bright Futures, Copley Hospital, and the Lamoille Family Center. Pregnant and postpartum women, infants, and children under 5 enrolled in Medicaid insurance in Vermont are automatically eligible for WIC. For more information, visit www.healthvermont.org/wic or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/vdhmorrisville. Interested in applying? Simply call 1-800-649-4357.


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

3-4-50 Lamoille

By: Valerie Valcour

Vermont has ranked as the number 1 and number 2 healthiest state for the past 7 years. That’s good news! Yet according to the Department of Health, 55% of all deaths in Vermont result from chronic diseases caused by 3 behaviors: lack of physical activity, poor diet and tobacco use. These 3 behaviors can lead to 4 diseases: cancer, heart disease and stroke, Type 2 diabetes and lung disease. These 4 diseases lead to more than 50% of all deaths in Vermont.

3-4-50 is a new prevention campaign to support the health of Vermonters. The 3-4-50 concept is a helpful tool when supporting families to live longer, healthier lives, in safe and vibrant communities.

3-4-50

So what is our local Department of Health doing to help families live healthier lives? One example is helping local businesses become Breastfeeding Friendly Employers. Check out the list of employers here. Another example is helping the Lamoille Regional Planning Commission include health, recreation and healthy food practices in the regional plan. Yet another example is the creation of the Healthy Lamoille Valley coalition, which is made possible by a grant from the Vermont Department of Health and the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration.

You may recall, I recently wrote about the benefits of walkable communities. Celebrate summer and get out to enjoy the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail, sidewalks, backroads, and other local resources in your communities. Bring a friend or family member for added support, safety and fun. Grab an apple or banana instead of that candy bar the next time you shop for a snack. Go to 802 Quits for resources to help you or a loved one quit smoking.

Visit 3-4-50 to learn more about active living, healthy eating and tobacco prevention. Live Well Lamoille!


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Walkable Communitites

By: Valerie Valcour

Is your neighborhood or community walkable? What does walkable mean, anyway? Walkable or wheelchair roll-able means that anyone of any ability can get around by walking or using their wheelchair. Getting around can mean getting to a grocery store or the post office, or being able to exercise and have fun. Did you know that the average person who lives in a walkable community can weigh 6-10 pounds less? You can check your community’s Walk Score here.

walkable community

If your community is walkable and you feel safe walking or wheelchair rolling, here are a few helpful tips to get started on your journey:

  • Set a realistic goal for yourself.
  • Take a look around you and figure out what you can do every day to add more walking or wheelchair rolling to your routine.
  • Track your progress and celebrate your success!

Find more health tips by going to the Health Department’s mymoment web page. You can also check out Copley’s Wellness Resources here.

Some communities do not have sidewalks, or there may be safety concerns. There are ways you can get involved to make your community more walkable and wheelchair roll-able. You can reach out to your Town Clerk and ask about your town’s plan regarding walking, biking and recreation. You can start a conversation by asking your town to conduct a walking audit. Walkable communities are not just healthy, they are also attractive and fun. The Vermont Department of Health’s Active Living guide can give you some ideas to help make your community more walkable.

Live well! Promote walking and walkable communities for all ages and abilities. Learn how by visiting http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/walking/call-to-action/pdf/infographic.pdf .


Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. In addition to her work, she volunteers as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

 

Valerie Valcour, Department of Health in Morrisville

Valerie Valcour

Valerie Valcour is a Public Health Nurse and specializes in chronic disease prevention and emergency preparedness at the community level for the Department of Health in Morrisville. Valerie has lived in Lamoille County most of her life. She graduated from People’s Academy in 1983 and worked as a nurse at Copley Hospital for several years. Recently Valerie has volunteered as a board member of both Community Health Services of Lamoille Valley and the Lamoille County Planning Commission.

Valerie will share information about health topics, such as vaccinations, nutrition for your family, health activities offered in schools, how to make your neighborhood more walking friendly, and how communities can prepare for all types of emergencies.