Archive - February 2019

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The Winter Blues
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Exercising During the Workday is a Win-Win

The Winter Blues

By: Caleb Magoon

Seasonal Affective Disorder

In my blog posts, I normally talk about staying active, fit and healthy. Of course, this is my wheelhouse. But this month I’m tackling a different subject: the all-too-familiar winter blues.

I’m generally a positive and upbeat person. I also love winter. I like to play in the snow and make the most of it, no matter the condition. But just a couple weeks ago something happened- I was in a bad car accident that has left me injured. Though my injury isn’t severe, it has left me unable to participate in many of the winter activities that bring me joy during these challenging months.

This has been a profound awakening for me. While I undergo rehab to get back to form, I now have a much greater understanding of and respect for those who are not able-bodied. The challenges of staying upbeat in our long winter become even harder with even modest limitations. So do mundane tasks like shoveling snow and walking down the road when your body can’t keep up.

What can we do but adapt? This can be very hard for someone like myself with set ways and ideas of how my winter should be. But adapting and making adjustments is the only way to stay positive. Here are some thoughts I have about the process:

  • Do what you can! Walking is widely recognized as an excellent exercise. It’s considerably lower speed than I am used to but necessary. It’s forced me to slow things down and take stock. This is good for both physical and mental recovery. Don’t discount the importance of some quiet time to think.
  • Stretch – Anyone can do it. A little physical therapy and stretching can do everyone good. It’s also the gateway to more robust activity. There are so many resources online that it’s easy to get started.
  • Exercise is mental – Every time I ski or bike I am helping my body and my mind. While my body must take it easy for the immediate future, I need to focus on sharpening my mind. I am reading the paper a bit more, writing in a journal about things going on in my life and working to reflect on the good things in life. Stay positive.
  • Set some goals – We all want to get back out. Setting modest goals will help the downtime fly by and keep you focused on recovery. We all want to be ready to enjoy that first sunny, 50-degree day in March. Be ready for it!
  • Don’t forget to socialize – Mental health is greatly improved when we engage with other people. Taking myself out of my routine pulls me away from the people I normally interact with. I tend to pull back from people and isolate a bit. This isn’t healthy. In situations like this, we all need to go out of our way to stay engaged with others.

I now recognize the challenges of those who are less able-bodied to get through our long winters. You can make it through by staying positive and focusing on doing the things we are able to do.


Caleb Magoon is a Hyde Park native who grew up hiking, hunting, biking and exploring Vermont’s Green Mountains. His passions for sports and recreation have fueled his career as the owner of Power Play Sports and Waterbury Sports. Caleb encourages outdoor activity and believes it is an essential element to a healthy lifestyle and the Vermont way of life. Caleb serves the Lamoille Valley by volunteering on numerous community boards such as the Lamoille County Planning Commission, The Morrisville Alliance for Commerce and Culture, Mellow Velo, and the state chapter of The Main Street Alliance. He lives, plays and works in Hyde Park with his wife Kerrie.

Exercising During the Workday is a Win-Win

By: Michele Whitmore

exercising during the workday

A couple of weeks ago, I read a great article on LinkedIn about the importance of taking time to exercise during the workday. The article affirmed my own personal feelings and beliefs about taking time out your workday for “me time”—and not feeling guilty about it. The guilt piece, I put on myself; we are all likely a little guilty of this too.

However, what I keep reminding myself is:

  • Regular exercise releases brain chemicals key for memory, concentration, and mental sharpness.
  • Regular exercise has been shown to increase efficiency.
  • Regular exercise helps maintain healthy blood pressure and weight.
  • Regular exercise improves one’s energy.
  • Regular exercise can improve one’s mood while also lowering stress and anxiety.

Life is busy. If you are a parent with active children, finding time to exercise after work or on weekends can be challenging. Been there, done that—not so well.

What I have learned is that scheduling in a “me” appointment either in the morning before the workday begins or taking a “runch” during the workday has made all the difference in my focus, productivity, and energy at work. I notice the difference when I do not make the time, and so does my supervisor, coworkers, and family. Now, they encourage me and remind me of the importance of that appointment which helps lessen my guilt and stick to my exercise plan.

Check with your supervisor first and let them know your “me time” plan and how it might slightly impact your work schedule, just in case you need a little flexibility getting into the office in the morning or taking a little extra time during lunch. That time will be made up because you will be more efficient, productive, focused, energized, happy, and healthy—all important attributes that a supervisor looks for.

Here are a few additional resources:

“How Exercise Can Improve Your Productivity and Efficiency.” Balance  – http://www.asteronlife.com.au/balance/fitness/exerciseproductivity#sthash.OTVVRaxR.dpbs

“How to Exercise During the Workday (And Why it’s Important).” BBC – http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20190116-why-you-should-exercise-during-the-workday—and-how?ocid=ww.social.link.linkedin

 


Michele Whitmore is the Associate Dean of Students at Johnson State College. She works closely with Student Service Departments within the College to provide purposeful events to students that will strengthen their professional leadership, personal growth, life skills development and social engagement. Thus far, the College has provided educational programs that cover LGBTQ issues, alcohol and drug use, sexual assault prevention, socio-economic struggles, and healthy choices related to eating well and being fit, to name a few. Michele writes about the outreach and program opportunities that enhance the wellness of a campus community.