Archive - January 2017

1
Make Your Voice Heard! Join a Local Recreation Committee
2
Building Bright Futures
3
Understanding AFib
4
GO PRO (as in Probiotics)
5
Meet our Newest Blogger: Dr. David Mooney of Lamoille County Mental Health Services

Make Your Voice Heard! Join a Local Recreation Committee

By: Tricia Follert

Live Well Lamoille_ice skating

It’s that time of year that we are all hoping for snow, snow and more snow. Whether snowshoeing, skiing, skating or taking your dog for a walk, it’s a beautiful time to be outside to enjoy all the beauty that Lamoille region has to offer. We all know the benefits of outdoor recreation. It provides a time to clear your mind and do something good for your body and soul.

This is a great place to live, work and play, but I have heard many times that there is not enough for kids to do. We’d love to involve more people in recreational planning for our community. Would you consider joining a recreation committee? It would be a great opportunity to share your opinion about what this community should offer. 

Below are a few recreational opportunities open to the public:

  1. This year we are attempting to have a skating rink at Oxbow Riverfront Park! It’s been a bit of a struggle getting the location set up and getting ice into the rink, but it is finally coming along. Hopefully we’ll have some cold weather in the coming weeks to get some ice built up.
  2. The summer music series at Oxbow Riverfront Park is coming into its sixth year, better than ever. The first music series event we held in June of 2011 attracted a crowd of 35; last year there were hundreds of people at each and every music event. This is a great example of our community coming together and building strong roots.
  3. Did you know there are two sets of horseshoe pits at the park? Gather your friends and start some tournaments, or just go and enjoy throwing some shoes.
  4. On Thursday evenings a group meets and plays ultimate Frisbee. It’s free, open to the public and lots of fun.

We’d like to see more healthy opportunities in the community and we ask that you help make it happen.  If you’re interested in being on the recreation committee please contact me:

Tricia Follert
Community Development Coordinator
Town of Morristown
tfollert@morristownvt.org


Tricia Follert is the Community Development Coordinator for the Town of Morristown, where she coordinates and implements activities for the town. She currently sits on three local boards, River Arts, Lamoille County Planning Commission and the Morristown Alliance for Commerce and Culture, and works closely with many local nonprofits on community projects. She is also actively involved in the community gardens, the rail trail and the arts.

Building Bright Futures

By: Steve Ames

Live Well Lamille - Building Bright Futures

It’s a great time to be a kid in Vermont! For the first time, this year, all 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds who don’t attend kindergarten are entitled to ten hours of free preK a week for 35 weeks of the year. This year 7,300 kids took advantage of public preK at both schools and at qualified child cares!

At the same time, the Agency of Education began to use a revised measure to see how many kids are considered ready for Kindergarten. They found that over 80% of kids in kindergarten are ready! This is great news.

The percent of families living in poverty in Vermont has decreased as well. The outcomes for new moms and kids (Maternal Child Health) is measured as second in the country behind our neighbors in Massachusetts.

More Vermont kids are receiving the full series of recommended vaccines now than ever before – over 76% last year. The list of good news and positive indicators goes on, but there’s always work to do!

As we look ahead, there remain a couple of significant challenges to consider. First, with over 70% of children having both parents in the workforce, it’s critically important that Lamoille Valley kids have high quality child care options. That way, their parents, if they so choose, can work and contribute to our wellbeing and economic prosperity. This is particularly true for infant care – there are virtually no infant care spots in our county, and child care providers have long, long waiting lists for infants.

Additionally, there are troubling trends with the increase of children under age nine entering Department of Children and Families custody in our area, and throughout Vermont. We need to address the causes of this terrible outcome for kids and families.

Building Bright Futures just released their report detailing how young children are faring in the Lamoille Valley, and across the State. To find out more, visit http://buildingbrightfutures.org/initiatives/how-are-vermonts-young-children.

If you want to join the Building Bright Futures team that works to monitor and address challenges (and celebrate successes!) for young children and families, consider coming to a Regional Council meeting at the Playroom on the second Tuesday of the month from 3:30 till 5:30. Hope to see you there!


As the Regional Coordinator for Building Bright Futures, Steve staffs The Lamoille Valley Building Bright Futures Regional Council, a volunteer committee focused on the well being of young children and their families. There is one such Council in each of twelve regions of the State. Steve also works with the Playroom in Morrisville. He writes about early childhood, families, community, play, and equity.

Understanding AFib

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is an irregular heart rate that can increase your risk of stroke and other health complications. In this video, Copley Hospital cardiologist Dr. Adam Kunin explains the condition, why it should concern you, and what can be done to prevent it.

 

Copley Hospital Cardiology specializes in finding, treating, and preventing heart attacks, heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances and diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Learn more at www.copleyvt.org/medical-services/cardiology-heart-health

If you are recovering from a heart attack, bypass surgery, stent placement or other heart event you could benefit from Copley’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program. The program can help improve your quality of life and help you reach a higher level of functioning. You’ll exercise, retrain your breathing and develop coping and support skills to better manage your condition. Learn more at www.copleyvt.org/medical-services/rehabilitation-services/cardiac-pulmonary-rehabilitation.

GO PRO (as in Probiotics)

By: Dr. David Mooney

There is now ample research and preliminary trials to support the ability of gut microbes to influence mood and behavior. Numerous studies have also shown that the administration of probiotics can even reverse certain psychological disorders.

what-are-probiotics

A brief history:

Fermented foods have provided probiotic bacteria in the gut throughout history. All traditional cultures fermented their foods, lived in and with nature, and ate from it in a way that promoted a now endangered diversity of gut microbes. Food fermentation dates back more than seven thousand years to winemaking in the Middle East. The Chinese were fermenting cabbage six thousand years ago.

The Russian scientist Elie Mechnikov, considered the father of immunology, won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1908 for his investigation of the benefits of lactic acid bacteria to human health. He studied the correlation between the longevity of Bulgarian peasants and their consumption of fermented milk products. He suggested that “oral administration of cultures of fermentative bacteria would implant the beneficial bacteria in the intestinal tract.” Mechnikov believed that toxic bacteria in the gut contributed to aging and that lactic acid could help prolong life. He coined the phrase “probiotic” to describe beneficial bacteria.

People have enjoyed one form of fermented food or another long before probiotics became available from health food stores. Think sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), yogurt (fermented milk products), and kimchi (a spicy condiment usually made from cabbage or cucumber that is the national dish of Korea).

There is no better way to consume a rich array of healthy bacteria than to consume them through wholly natural sources, such as sauerkraut, pickles, kimchi, and other fermented vegetables. Bacteria consumed in this manner are easily accepted by the body. They work in various ways. They help maintain the integrity of the gut lining; balance the body’s pH; serve as natural antibiotics, antivirals, and antifungals; regulate immunity; and control inflammation. In addition, probiotics suppress the growth and even invasion of potentially pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances called bacteriocins (proteins that inhibit or kill the growth of “bad bacteria.”) As these bacteria metabolize their sources of fuel from your diet, they liberate various nutrients contained in the foods you eat, making them easier to be absorbed. For example, they increase the availability of vitamins A, C, K, and many of the B group vitamins.

Most people do not have any side effects to probiotics but for some, especially those whose gut bacteria has been out of balance for years, there can be a “transitional period” when existing problems such as gas and bloating can actually be aggravated.

When choosing a probiotic, it is important to choose one that has the strains that have been demonstrated to be effective for your needs:

For the immune system: L. paracasei, L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, L. johnsonii, L. fermentum, L. reuteri, L. plantarum, B. longum, and B. animalis.

For anti-inflammatory functions: L. paracasei, L .plantarum, and P. pentosaceus.

For depression, anxiety, and other psychiatric concerns: Strains in the Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genuses have been shown to have an emerging role. Look for high-quality probiotics that contain a variety of strains in the billions.

Be Well,

Dr. Mooney


Dr. David Mooney is a native Vermonter and serves as the Medical Director at Lamoille County Mental Health Services. He completed his premedical studies at the University of Vermont and obtained his medical degree at American University of the Caribbean. Dr. Mooney then returned to Vermont where he completed his residency in psychiatry and also a fellowship in Public and Community Psychiatry through the University of Vermont. He has decades of experience in hospital and community psychiatry. His main interests lie in Integrative Medicine for all types of mental illnesses, combining traditional and holistic approaches.

Meet our Newest Blogger: Dr. David Mooney of Lamoille County Mental Health Services

Dr. David MooneyDr. David Mooney is a native Vermonter. He grew up in Newport and is the Medical Director at Lamoille County Mental Health Services. He completed his premedical studies at the University of Vermont and obtained his medical degree at American University of the Caribbean. Dr. Mooney then returned to Vermont where he completed his residency in psychiatry and also a fellowship in Public and Community Psychiatry through the University of Vermont. He has decades of experience in hospital and community psychiatry. His main interests lie in Integrative Medicine for all types of mental illnesses, combining traditional and holistic approaches.

Dr. Mooney enjoys spending time with family, skiing, beekeeping, raising chickens, and playing bass in the Vermont Fiddle Orchestra.